What is tone up?

Some articles on tone, tones:

Jozef Murgaš - Life - United States - Importance and Primacy Conflicts
... The tone system is the use of two signals of different frequencies, i.e ... Murgaš substituted the "dot" of the Morse code with a higher tone and the "dash" with a lower tone (this is the 1904 patent "The way of transmitted messages by wireless telegraphy") ...
Tone, Ibaraki
... Tone (利根町, Tone-machi?) is a town located in Kitasōma District, Ibaraki, Japan ...
Bantry Bay - History - Rebellion of 1798
... land launch a rebellion was made by a French fleet, including Wolfe Tone in December 1796 ... Tone wrote of the expedition in his diary, saying that We were close enough to toss a biscuit ashore ... square in Bantry is today named after Wolfe Tone ...
Limburgish Language - Tone - Particular Local Features - Diphthongization
... and high vowels tend to diphthongize when they have a push tone ... and lexical "grave" "hole next to a road" Verbs distinguish mood with tone "We conquer!" "May we conquer!" The difference between push tone and dragging tone may ...
Shanghainese - Phonology - Tones - Tone Sandhi
... Tone sandhi is a process whereby adjacent tones undergo dramatic alteration in connected speech ... Northern Wu dialects, Shanghainese is characterized by two forms of tone sandhi a word tone sandhi and a phrasal tone sandhi ... Word tone sandhi in Shanghainese can be described as left-prominent and is characterized by a dominance of the first syllable over the contour of the entire tone domain ...

Famous quotes containing the word tone:

    Eloquence resides as much in the tone of voice, in the eyes, and in the expression of the face, as in the choice of words.
    François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613–1680)

    If the oarsmen of a fast-moving ship suddenly cease to row, the suspension of the driving force of the oars doesn’t prevent the vessel from continuing to move on its course. And with a speech it is much the same. After he has finished reciting the document, the speaker will still be able to maintain the same tone without a break, borrowing its momentum and impulse from the passage he has just read out.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C)