What is thread?

  • (verb): Pass through or into.
    Example: "Thread tape"; "thread film"
    See also — Additional definitions below

More definitions of "thread":

  • (verb): Pass a thread through.
    Example: "Thread a needle"
  • (noun): A fine cord of twisted fibers (of cotton or silk or wool or nylon etc.) used in sewing and weaving.
    Synonyms: yarn
  • (noun): The connections that link the various parts of an event or argument together.
    Example: "He lost the thread of his argument"
    Synonyms: train of thought
  • (noun): The raised helical rib going around a screw.
    Synonyms: screw thread
  • (noun): Any long object resembling a thin line.
    Example: "From the air the road was a gray thread"; "a thread of smoke climbed upward"
    Synonyms: ribbon
  • (verb): Remove facial hair by tying a fine string around it and pulling at the string.
    Example: "She had her eyebrows threaded"
  • (verb): Thread on or as if on a string.
    Example: "Thread dried cranberries"
    Synonyms: string, draw
  • (verb): To move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course.
    Synonyms: weave, wind, meander, wander

Famous quotes containing the word thread:

    Tom Hyde, the tinker, standing on the gallows, was asked if he had anything to say. “Tell the tailors,” said he, “to remember to make a knot in their thread before they take the first stitch.” His companion’s prayer is forgotten.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Fate forces its way to the powerful and violent. With subservient obedience it will assume for years dependency on one individual: Caesar, Alexander, Napoleon, because it loves the elemental human being who grows to resemble it, the intangible element. Sometimes, and these are the most astonishing moments in world history, the thread of fate falls into the hands of a complete nobody but only for a twitching minute.
    Stefan Zweig (18811942)

    One sought not absolute truth. One sought only a spool on which to wind the thread of history without breaking it.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)