What is symbolism?

  • (noun): An artistic movement in the late 19th century that tried to express abstract or mystical ideas through the symbolic use of images.
    See also — Additional definitions below

Symbolism

Symbolism is the practice of representing things by symbols, or of investing things with a symbolic meaning or character. A symbol is an object, action, or idea that represents something other than itself, often of a more abstract nature. Symbolism creates quality aspects that make literature like poetry and novels more meaningful.

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Some articles on symbolism:

Miracle Of The Roses - Symbolism of The Rose
... In the Latin West the symbolism of the rose is a Greco-Roman heritage but influenced and finally transformed through Latin biblical texts which were also liturgical ... The rose acquired in the Greco-Roman culture a symbolism which can be summarized thus The rose represented beauty, the season of spring, and love ... This symbolism attained a deeper complexity when contrasted with the thorns among which this flower blossoms ...
Simbolul - History - Context
... Another important factor in the evolution from Symbolism to radical modernism between 1895 and 1920 was the literary and artistic circle formed around controversial politician ... Romanian avant-gardism, and which established connections not just with Symbolism, but also with the Futurism of Italian writer Filippo Tommaso ... Thus, Simbolul was called by Cernat "a turning plate between the Symbolism of Insula contributors and pre-avant-gardist Post-symbolism." ...

More definitions of "symbolism":

  • (noun): A system of symbols and symbolic representations.

Famous quotes containing the word symbolism:

    ...I remembered the rose bush that had reached a thorny branch out through the ragged fence, and caught my dress, detaining me when I would have passed on. And again the symbolism of it all came over me. These memories and visions of the poor—they were the clutch of the thorns. Social workers have all felt it. It holds them to their work, because the thorns curve backward, and one cannot pull away.
    Albion Fellows Bacon (1865–1933)