What is store?

  • (verb): Find a place for and put away for storage.
    Example: "Where should we stow the vegetables?"; "I couldn't store all the books in the attic so I sold some"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on store:

Jenners - History
... The store was run for many years by the Douglas-Miller family, who were descendants of James Kennedy, who took charge of Jenners in 1881 ... The original buildings that formed the department store were destroyed by fire in 1892, and in 1893 the Scottish architect William Hamilton Beattie was appointed to design the new store which ... The new store included many technical innovations such as electric lighting and hydraulic lifts ...
Are You Being Served?
... a large, fictional London department store ... period in the early 1950s working at Simpsons of Piccadilly, a clothing store which traded for over 60 years until 1999 ... The inspiration for the store has also been credited to Rossiters of Paignton department store from the time Lloyd and Croft spent there, and the former Clements of Watford ...

More definitions of "store":

  • (noun): A mercantile establishment for the retail sale of goods or services.
    Synonyms: shop
  • (noun): A supply of something available for future use.
    Example: "He brought back a large store of Cuban cigars"
    Synonyms: stock, fund

Famous quotes containing the word store:

    ‘Twant for powder an’ for store bought hair,
    De man ah love would not gone no where, no where.
    W.C. Handy (1873–1958)

    What harm cause not those huge draughts or pictures which wanton youth with chalk or coals draw in each passage, wall or stairs of our great houses, whence a cruel contempt of our natural store is bred in them?
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

    Modern man, if he dared to be articulate about his concept of heaven, would describe a vision which would look like the biggest department store in the world, showing new things and gadgets, and himself having plenty of money with which to buy them. He would wander around open-mouthed in this heaven of gadgets and commodities, provided only that there were ever more and newer things to buy, and perhaps that his neighbors were just a little less privileged than he.
    Erich Fromm (1900–1980)