What is silver cord?

  • (noun): The emotional bond between a mother and her offspring.

Silver Cord

The silver cord in metaphysical studies and literature, also known as the sutratma or life thread of the antahkarana, refers to a life-giving linkage from the higher self (atma) down to the physical body. It also refers to an extended synthesis of this thread and a second (the consciousness thread, passing from the soul to the physical body) that connects the physical body to the etheric body, onwards to the astral body and finally to the mental body.

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Some articles on silver cord:

Spiritwalker (Native) - Bible
... that the subtle body is attached to the physical body by means of a psychic silver cord ... the Biblical Book of Ecclesiastes is often cited in this respect "Before the silver cord be loosed, or the golden bowl be broken, or the pitcher be shattered at the fountain, or the wheel ...
Astral Projection - Beliefs - Bible
... subtle body is attached to the physical body by means of a psychic silver cord ... the Biblical Book of Ecclesiastes is often cited in this respect "Before the silver cord be loosed, or the golden bowl be broken, or the pitcher be shattered at the fountain, or the wheel be broken at the cistern ...
Silver Cord - In Popular Culture
... Former Moody Blues singer Mike Pinder sings of the silver cord in his solo album Among The Stars with the lyric "All aboard, the silver cord, the tour's about to start ... In Jethro Tull's A Passion Play, the lyrics "the silver cord lies on the ground" are used to indicate the death of someone observing his own funeral ...

Famous quotes containing the words silver cord, cord and/or silver:

    Or ever the silver cord be loosed, or the golden bowl be broken, or
    the pitcher be broken at the fountain, or the wheel broken at the
    cistern.
    Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was: and the spirit
    shall return unto God who gave it.
    Vanity of vanities, saith the preacher, all is vanity.
    Bible: Hebrew Ecclesiastes (l. XII, 6–7)

    Ah! How neatly tied, in these people, is the umbilical cord of morality! Since they left their mothers they have never sinned, have they? They are apostles, they are the descendants of priests; one can only wonder from what source they draw their indignation, and above all how much they have pocketed to do this, and in any case what it has done for them.
    Antonin Artaud (1896–1948)

    O, let us have him, for his silver hairs
    Will purchase us a good opinion,
    And buy men’s voices to commend our deeds.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)