What is silver?

  • (noun): A soft white precious univalent metallic element having the highest electrical and thermal conductivity of any metal; occurs in argentite and in free form; used in coins and jewelry and tableware and photography.
    Synonyms: Ag, atomic number 47
    See also — Additional definitions below

Silver

Silver is a metallic chemical element with the chemical symbol Ag (Greek: άργυρος <árgyros>, Latin: argentum, both from the Indo-European root *arg- for "grey" or "shining") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it has the highest electrical conductivity of any element and the highest thermal conductivity of any metal. The metal occurs naturally in its pure, free form (native silver), as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining.

Read more about Silver.

Some articles on silver:

Our Lady Of The Gate Of Dawn - Veneration - Miracles and Votive Offerings
... The commander, grateful for the victory, bestowed the chapel with a large silver votive offering ... a Russian soldier for an attempt to steal her silver clothes in 1708, and numerous miraculous healings ... They are usually small silver objects (hearts, crucifixes, figures of praying people, images of cured eyes, legs, arms) ...
Uzbekistan At The 2004 Summer Olympics - Medalists - Silver
... Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman (74 kg) 2 Silver Ibragimov, MagomedMagomed Ibragimov Wrestling Men's Freestyle (74 kg) 3 Bronze Sooltonov, BahodirjonBahodirjon Sooltonov Boxing Men's ...
Silver - Human Exposure and Consumption - Use in Food
... Silver is used in food coloring it has the E174 designation and is approved in the European Union ... The amount of silver in the coating of dragée or as in cookie decoration is minuscule ... The safety of silver for use in food is disputed ...
George Silver
... George Silver (ca ... and eleventh in descent from Sir Bartholomew Silver, who was knighted by Edward II ...
Imperial Crypt - The Sarcophagi
19th century a mixture of cast brass and bronze as well as silver-bronzed copper was adopted ... Other metals were used only rarely, except for silver and gold plating on decorations ... lies a wooden coffin that is wrapped in silk (black with gold trim for rulers, red with silver trim for others) ...

More definitions of "silver":

  • (adj): Having the white lustrous sheen of silver.
    Example: "A land of silver (or silvern) rivers where the salmon leap"
    Synonyms: silvern, silvery
  • (verb): Turn silver.
    Example: "The man's hair silvered very attractively"
  • (noun): Coins made of silver.
  • (adj): Made from or largely consisting of silver.
    Example: "Silver bracelets"
  • (verb): Coat with a layer of silver or a silver amalgam.
    Example: "Silver the necklace"
  • (noun): A medal made of silver (or having the appearance of silver) that is usually awarded for winning second place in a competition.
    Synonyms: silver medal
  • (noun): Silverware eating utensils.
    Synonyms: flatware
  • (verb): Make silver in color.
    Example: "Her worries had silvered her hair"

Famous quotes containing the word silver:

    A black pall, you know, with a silver cross on it, or R.I.P.—requiescat in pace—you know. That seems to me the most beautiful expression—I like it much better than ‘He is a jolly good fellow,’ which is simply rowdy.
    Thomas Mann (1875–1955)

    Eftsoones the Nymphes, which now had Flowers their fill,
    Ran all in haste, to see that silver brood,
    As they came floating on the Christal Flood,
    Edmund Spenser (1552?–1599)

    “Maman”, said Annaïse, her voice strangely weak. “Here is the water.”
    A thin blade of silver came forward in the plain and the peasants ran alongside it, crying and singing.
    ...
    “Oh, Manuel, Manuel, why are you dead?” moaned Délira.
    “No”, said Annaïse, and she smiled through her tears, “no, he is not dead”.
    She took the old woman’s hand and pressed gently against her belly where new life stirred.
    Jacques Roumain (1907–1945)