What is serve?

  • (verb): Promote, benefit, or be useful or beneficial to.
    Synonyms: serve well
    See also — Additional definitions below

More definitions of "serve":

  • (verb): Be used by; as of a utility.
    Synonyms: service
  • (verb): Mate with.
    Example: "Male animals serve the females for breeding purposes"
    Synonyms: service
  • (verb): Help to some food; help with food or drink.
    Synonyms: help
  • (verb): Do military service.
    Example: "She served in Vietnam"; "My sons never served, because they are short-sighted"
  • (verb): Spend time in prison or in a labor camp.
    Synonyms: do
  • (verb): Be sufficient; be adequate, either in quality or quantity.
    Example: "Nothing else will serve"
    Synonyms: suffice, do, answer
  • (verb): Do duty or hold offices; serve in a specific function.
    Example: "He served as head of the department for three years"; "She served in Congress for two terms"
  • (noun): (sports) a stroke that puts the ball in play.
    Synonyms: service
  • (verb): Devote (part of) one's life or efforts to, as of countries, institutions, or ideas.
    Example: "She served the art of music"; "He served the church"; "serve the country"
  • (verb): Contribute or conduce to.
    Example: "The scandal served to increase his popularity"
  • (verb): Serve a purpose, role, or function.
    Example: "This table would serve very well"
    Synonyms: function
  • (verb): Put the ball into play.
    Example: "It was Agassi's turn to serve"
  • (verb): Provide (usually but not necessarily food).
    Example: "We serve meals for the homeless"
    Synonyms: serve up, dish out, dish up, dish

Famous quotes containing the word serve:

    We need not fear excessive influence. A more generous trust is permitted. Serve the great. Stick at no humiliation. Grudge no office thou canst render. Be the limb of their body, the breath of their mouth. Compromise thy egotism.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Today democracy, liberty, and equality are words to fool the people. No nation can progress with such ideas. They stand in the way of action. Therefore we frankly abolish them. In the future each man will serve the interest of the state with absolute obedience. Let him who refuses beware.
    Charlie Chaplin (1889–1977)

    In naturally strong-minded men, however young and inexperienced in some things, those great and sudden emergencies, which but confound the timid and the weak, only serve to call forth all their generous latentness, and teach them, as by inspiration, extraordinary maxims of conduct, whose counterpart, in other men, is only the result of a long, variously-tried and pains-taking life.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)