What is serpent mound?

Serpent Mound

The Great Serpent Mound is a 1,348-foot (411 m)-long, three-foot-high prehistoric effigy mound located on a plateau of the Serpent Mound crater along Ohio Brush Creek in Adams County, Ohio. Maintained within a park by the Ohio Historical Society, it has been designated a National Historic Landmark by the United States Department of Interior. The Serpent Mound of Ohio was first reported from surveys by Ephraim Squire and Edwin Davis in their historic volume Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley, published in 1848 by the newly founded Smithsonian Museum.

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Some articles on serpent mound:

Serpent Mound Crater
... Serpent Mound crater, also known as the Serpent Mound Disturbance, is an eroded meteorite impact crater in Ohio, United States ... The crater is named after the Serpent Mound, an effigy mound, located on a plateau in Brush Creek Valley within the crater ...
Preservation - Serpent Mound Museum
... (1,800 mm) map that depicted the outline of the Serpent Mound in relation to nearby landmarks, such as rivers ... of the area, and he discovered the unique cryptoexplosion structure on which the mound is based ... He found that the mound is at the convergence of three distinctly different soil types ...
Adams County, Ohio - Geography
... including one of Ohio's greatest archeological wonders, the Serpent Mound at the Serpent Mound State Memorial in Locust Grove, Ohio ... Serpent Mound lends its name to the Serpent Mound crater, the eroded remnant of a huge ancient meteorite impact crater ...

Famous quotes containing the words mound and/or serpent:

    Worn down by the hoofs of millions of half-wild Texas cattle driven along it to the railheads in Kansas, the trail was a bare, brown, dusty strip hundreds of miles long, lined with the bleaching bones of longhorns and cow ponies. Here and there a broken-down chuck wagon or a small mound marking the grave of some cowhand buried by his partners “on the lone prairie” gave evidence to the hardships of the journey.
    —For the State of Kansas, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    Though gilded and golden, the serpent of vice is a serpent still.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)