What is savage?

  • (noun): A cruelly rapacious person.
    Synonyms: beast, wolf, brute, wildcat
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on savage:

William M. Fields
... He is best known for his collaboration with Sue Savage-Rumbaugh beginning in 1997 at the Language Research Center of Georgia State University ... There he co-reared Nyota, a baby bonobo, with Panbanisha, Kanzi and Savage-Rumbaugh ... Fields and Savage-Rumbaugh are the only scientists in the world carrying out language research with bonobos ...
Savage, Maryland
... Savage is a historic town located in Howard County, Maryland, about 12 miles (19 km) south of Baltimore and 20 miles (32 km) north of Washington, D.C ... The lands of Savage were first settled around 1650 ... Colonel Henry Ridgely surveyed the land around Savage Mill and nearby Annapolis Junction in 1685 naming the tract "Ridgely's Forrest" ...

More definitions of "savage":

  • (verb): Attack brutally and fiercely.
  • (noun): A member of an uncivilized people.
    Synonyms: barbarian

Famous quotes containing the word savage:

    In particular I may mention Sophocles the poet, who was once asked in my presence, “How do you feel about love, Sophocles? are you still capable of it?” to which he replied, “Hush! if you please: to my great delight I have escaped from it, and feel as if I had escaped from a frantic and savage master.” I thought then, as I do now, that he spoke wisely. For unquestionably old age brings us profound repose and freedom from this and other passions.
    Plato (c. 427–347 B.C.)

    You know, it’s a savage country, really. That’s the second one they shot in twenty years. It’s uncivilized—shooting people of substance.
    David Webb Peoples, screenwriter. English Bob (Richard Harris)

    I was glad to have got out of the towns, where I am wont to feel unspeakably mean and disgraced,—to have left behind me for a season the bar-rooms of Massachusetts, where the full-grown are not weaned from savage and filthy habits,—still sucking a cigar. My spirits rose in proportion to the outward dreariness. The towns needed to be ventilated. The gods would be pleased to see some pure flames from their altars. They are not to be appeased with cigar-smoke.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)