What is sami parliament?

Some articles on sami, sami parliament, parliament:

Sami Culture - Sami Policy - Norway
... The Sami have been recognized as an indigenous people in Norway (1990 according to ILO convention 169 as described below), and hence, according to ... The legal foundation of the Sami policy is Article 110a of the Norwegian Constitution ... The Sami Act (act of 12 June 1987 No ...
Sami Parliament Of Sweden
... The Sami Parliament of Sweden (Sametinget in Swedish and Sámediggi in Northern Sami) is the representative body for people of Sami heritage in Sweden ... It acts as an institution of cultural autonomy for the indigenous Sami people ... Municipalities Elections 2009 European Parliament election 2010 General election Referendums Political parties Foreign policy Foreign relations Politics of the European Union Related articles Sami ...
Sami Parliament Of Sweden - See Also
... List of Chairpersons of the Sami Parliament of Sweden Sámi politics Sami Parliament of Finland Sami Parliament of Norway ...
Sápmi (area) - Politics - Sami Political Structures - Sami Parliaments
... Every Norwegian citizen registered as a Sami has the right to vote in the elections for the Sami Parliament of Norway ... This is the Sami Parliament with most influence over any part of Sápmi, as it is involved in the autonomy established by the Finnmark Act.The parliament is situated in Kárášjohka and its current President is ... The Sami Parliament of Sweden, situated in Giron, is elected by a general vote where all registered Sami citizens of Sweden may attend ...
Karasjok - Economy - Tourism
... The attractions include the Sami parliament, Samediggi, the Sami museum, and the church, dating from 1807 ... The Sami parliament was opened in 1989, by King Olav V, the first Sami parliament president was Ole Henrik Magga, from Kautokeino ... The church is today too small, so a big, wooden church, inspired by Sami architecture, has been built ...

Famous quotes containing the word parliament:

    The war shook down the Tsardom, an unspeakable abomination, and made an end of the new German Empire and the old Apostolic Austrian one. It ... gave votes and seats in Parliament to women.... But if society can be reformed only by the accidental results of horrible catastrophes ... what hope is there for mankind in them? The war was a horror and everybody is the worse for it.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)