What is release?

Some articles on release, releases:

Who Framed Roger Rabbit - Release - Critical Reception
... In contrast, Richard Corliss, writing for Time, gave a mixed review ... "The opening cartoon works just fine, but too fine ...
SunOS - History
... SunOS version Release date Code base Description Sun UNIX 0.7 1982 UniSoft UNIX v7 Bundled with 68000-based Sun-1 system SunOS 1.0 1983 4.1BSD Support for 68010-based Sun-1 and Sun-2 systems SunOS 1.1 Apr ... for multiprocessor (SPARCserver 600MP) systems first CD-ROM-only release SunOS 4.1.3 Aug 1992 SunOS 4.1.3C Nov 1993 SPARCclassic/SPARCstation LX only SunOS 4.1.3_U1 Dec 1993 ... SunOS 4 supported Sun-2 (until release 4.0.3), Sun-3 (until 4.1.1), Sun386i (4.0, 4.0.1 and 4.0.2 only) and Sun-4 (SPARC) architectures ...
PlayStation 3 - History - Launch
... Soon after its release in Japan, the PS3 was released in North America on November 17, 2006 ... Reports of violence surrounding the release of the PS3 include a customer shot, campers robbed at gunpoint, customers shot in a drive-by shooting with ... The console was originally planned for a global release through November, but the European and rest-of-the-world's release was delayed "until March" at the start of September ...
PaintShop Pro - JASC Versions and Event History: 1990-2004
... It can be assumed that the official release fell on or before that date ... For non-italicized entries, the dates are taken from official press releases or notifications posted on JASC's web site. 1996 July — 4.00 This was the first 32-bit release (for Windows 95 and NT 4.0) ...
"SunOS" and "Solaris"
... This would become System V Release 4 (SVR4) ... On September 4, 1991, Sun announced that its next major OS release would switch from its BSD-derived source base to one based on SVR4 ... Although the internal designation of this release would be SunOS 5, from this point Sun began using the marketing name Solaris ...

More definitions of "release":

  • (noun): A process that liberates or discharges something.
    Example: "There was a sudden release of oxygen"; "the release of iodine from the thyroid gland"
  • (noun): A legal document evidencing the discharge of a debt or obligation.
    Synonyms: acquittance
  • (verb): Let (something) fall or spill a container.
    Synonyms: turn
  • (verb): Make (information) available publication.
    Example: "Release the list with the names of the prisoners"
    Synonyms: free
  • (noun): Merchandise issued for sale or public showing (especially a record or film).
    Example: "A new release from the London Symphony Orchestra"
  • (verb): Make (assets) available.
    Example: "Release the holdings in the dictator's bank account"
    Synonyms: unblock, unfreeze, free
  • (noun): Activity that releases or expresses creative energy or emotion.
    Synonyms: outlet, vent
  • (noun): An announcement distributed to members of the press in order to supplement or replace an oral presentation.
    Synonyms: handout, press release
  • (noun): (music) the act or manner of terminating a musical phrase or tone.
    Synonyms: tone ending
  • (verb): Generate and separate from cells or bodily fluids.
    Example: "Release a hormone into the blood stream"
    Synonyms: secrete
  • (noun): The act of allowing a fluid to escape.
    Synonyms: spill, spillage
  • (noun): A formal written statement of relinquishment.
    Synonyms: waiver, discharge

Famous quotes containing the word release:

    If I were to be taken hostage, I would not plead for release nor would I want my government to be blackmailed. I think certain government officials, industrialists and celebrated persons should make it clear they are prepared to be sacrificed if taken hostage. If that were done, what gain would there be for terrorists in taking hostages?
    Margaret Mead (1901–1978)

    The near touch of death may be a release into life; if only it will break the egoistic will, and release that other flow.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    We read poetry because the poets, like ourselves, have been haunted by the inescapable tyranny of time and death; have suffered the pain of loss, and the more wearing, continuous pain of frustration and failure; and have had moods of unlooked-for release and peace. They have known and watched in themselves and others.
    Elizabeth Drew (1887–1965)