What is rattling blanket woman?

Rattling Blanket Woman

Rattling Blanket Woman or Ta-sina Hlahla Win (1814-1844) was the mother of Crazy Horse. She may have been a member of either of the One Horn or Lone Horn families, leaders of the Miniconjou.

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Some articles on rattling blanket woman:

Rattling Blanket Woman
... Rattling Blanket Woman or Ta-sina Hlahla Win (1814-1844) was the mother of Crazy Horse ... In 1844, while out hunting buffalo, Rattling Blanket Woman's husband, Waglula (Worm) helped defend a Lakota village under attack by the Crow ... Unfortunately, when Waglula returned with the new wives, Rattling Blanket Woman, who had been unsuccessful in conceiving a new child, thought she had lost favor with her husband, and hung herself ...
Crazy Horse - Early Life - Family
... after having a vision.) His mother was Rattling Blanket Woman (born 1814) ... Rattling Blanket Woman was the daughter of Black Buffalo and White Cow (also known as Iron Cane) ... older siblings were Lone Horn (born 1790–1795, died 1875) and Good Looking Woman (born 1810) ...

Famous quotes containing the words woman, rattling and/or blanket:

    I have been searching history to see if really a woman has any precedent to claim the right to have her rights, and I am compelled to say that we men are not so much ahead of women after all, and the only way we have kept our reputation up is by keeping her down—and don’t you forget it!
    George E. Foster, U.S. women’s magazine contributor. The Woman’s Magazine, pp. 38-41 (October 1886)

    I throw myself down in my chamber, and I call in, and invite God, and his Angels thither, and when they are there, I neglect God and his Angels, for the noise of a fly, for the rattling of a coach, for the whining of a door.
    John Donne (c. 1572–1631)

    We agree fully that the mother and unborn child demand special consideration. But so does the soldier and the man maimed in industry. Industrial conditions that are suitable for a stalwart, young, unmarried woman are certainly not equally suitable to the pregnant woman or the mother of young children. Yet “welfare” laws apply to all women alike. Such blanket legislation is as absurd as fixing industrial conditions for men on a basis of their all being wounded soldiers would be.
    National Woman’s Party, quoted in Everyone Was Brave. As, ch. 8, by William L. O’Neill (1969)