What is radical feminism?

Radical Feminism

Radical feminism is a current perspective within feminism that focuses on the theory of patriarchy as a system of power that organizes society into a complex of relationships based on the assertion that male supremacy oppresses women. Radical feminism aims to challenge and overthrow patriarchy by opposing standard gender roles and oppression of women and calls for a radical reordering of society. Early radical feminism, arising within second-wave feminism in the 1960s, typically viewed patriarchy as a "transhistorical phenomenon" prior to or deeper than other sources of oppression, "not only the oldest and most universal form of domination but the primary form" and the model for all others. Later politics derived from radical feminism ranged from cultural feminism to more syncretic politics that placed issues of class, economics, etc. on a par with patriarchy as sources of oppression.

Read more about Radical Feminism.

Some articles on radical feminism:

Radical Feminism - Criticisms
... Within the New Left, radical feminists were accused of being "bourgeois", "antileft", or even "apolitical", whereas they saw themselves as further "radicalizing the left by expanding the definition of radical" ... Radical feminists have tended to be white and middle class ... the resulting narrow demographic base, in turn, limited the validity of generalizations based on radical feminists' personal experiences of gender relations ...
Misandry - Instances
... Academic Alice Echols, in her 1989 book Daring To Be Bad Radical Feminism in America, 1967–1975, argued that radical feminist Valerie Solanas, best ... women,' and her dismissal of sex as 'the refuge of the mindless' contravened the sort of radical feminism which prevailed in most women's groups across the country ... Nathanson and Young argued that "ideological feminism" has imposed misandry on culture ...

Famous quotes containing the words feminism and/or radical:

    When feminism does not explicitly oppose racism, and when antiracism does not incorporate opposition to patriarchy, race and gender politics often end up being antagonistic to each other and both interests lose.
    Kimberly Crenshaw (b. 1959)

    Every genuine boy is a rebel and an anarch. If he were allowed to develop according to his own instincts, his own inclinations, society would undergo such a radical transformation as to make the adult revolutionary cower and cringe.
    Henry Miller (1891–1980)