What is prose?

  • (noun): Matter of fact, commonplace, or dull expression.
    See also — Additional definitions below

Prose

Prose is a form of language which applies ordinary grammatical structure and natural flow of speech rather than rhythmic structure (as in traditional poetry). While there are critical debates on the construction of prose, its simplicity and loosely defined structure has led to its adoption for the majority of spoken dialogue, factual discourse as well as topical and fictional writing. It is commonly used, for example, in literature, newspapers, magazines, encyclopedias, broadcasting, film, history, philosophy, law and many other forms of communication.

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Some articles on prose:

Spring And All
... It is a hybrid work made up of alternating sections of prose and free verse ... It might best be understood as a manifesto of the imagination the prose passages are a dramatic, energetic, and often cryptic series of statements about the ways in ... never again published as a free-standing book, though the poems and some of the prose sections were reprinted in various combinations through the years ...
Prose - Types
... There are many types of prose, including nonfictional prose, heroic prose, prose poem, polyphonic prose, alliterative prose, prose fiction and village ... A prose poem is a composition in prose that has some of the qualities of a poem ...
András Petöcz - Work - Prose - Strangers
... György C ... Kálmán writes about Idegenek “In the world of the novel – it is difficult to interpret Petőcz’s work any other way – everyone is an outsider ...
Soviet Science Fiction - Late 19th - Early 20th Century
... grotesque element (The History of a Town and prose fables) ... Many prose works of Symbolist Valery Bryusov may be classified as science fiction ... Prose of Alexander Kondratyev who was close to Symbolism included "mythological novel" Satyress (1907) and collection of "mythological stories" White Goat (19 ...

More definitions of "prose":

  • (noun): Ordinary writing as distinguished from verse.

Famous quotes containing the word prose:

    The crown of literature is poetry. It is its end and aim. It is the sublimest activity of the human mind. It is the achievement of beauty and delicacy. The writer of prose can only step aside when the poet passes.
    W. Somerset Maugham (1874–1966)

    Despots play their part in the works of thinkers. Fettered words are terrible words. The writer doubles and trebles the power of his writing when a ruler imposes silence on the people. Something emerges from that enforced silence, a mysterious fullness which filters through and becomes steely in the thought. Repression in history leads to conciseness in the historian, and the rocklike hardness of much celebrated prose is due to the tempering of the tyrant.
    Victor Hugo (1802–1885)

    Science and art, or by the same token, poetry and prose differ from one another like a journey and an excursion. The purpose of the journey is its goal, the purpose of an excursion is the process.
    Franz Grillparzer (1791–1872)