What is poetry?

  • (noun): Literature in metrical form.
    Synonyms: poesy, verse
    See also — Additional definitions below

Poetry

Poetry (from the Greek poiesis — ποίησις — with a broad meaning of a "making", seen also in such terms as "hemopoiesis"; more narrowly, the making of poetry) is a form of literary art which uses the aesthetic qualities of language to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning.

Read more about Poetry.

Some articles on poetry:

Poetry - Genres
... In addition to specific forms of poems, poetry is often thought of in terms of different genres and subgenres ... A poetic genre is generally a tradition or classification of poetry based on the subject matter, style, or other broader literary characteristics ... Narrative poetry Narrative poetry is a genre of poetry that tells a story ...
Muse - Origins
... in both their names and their attributes Calliope -epic poetry Clio -history Euterpe -flutes and lyric poetry Thalia -comedy and pastoral poetry Melpomene -tragedy ...
Yuriy Tarnawsky - Selected Bibliography
... Life in the City (1956, poetry, Ukrainian) Popoludni v Pokipsi (Afternoons in Poughkeepsie) (1960, poetry, Ukrainian, New York Group Publishing) Shljaxy (Roads) (1961, novel ... FC2) 6x0 (1998, collected plays, Ukrainian, Rodovid) An Ideal Woman (1999, poetry, Ukrainian) The City of Sticks and Pits (1999, book-length poem, Ukrainian) Jix ...
Emblems of The Muses
... Muse Domain Emblem Calliope Epic poetry Writing tablet Clio History Scrolls Erato Love poetry Cithara (an ancient Greek musical instrument in the lyre family) Euterpe Song and Elegiac poetry ... Calliope (epic poetry) carries a writing tablet Clio (history) carries a scroll and books Erato (love/erotic poetry) is often seen with a lyre and a crown of roses ...

More definitions of "poetry":

  • (noun): Any communication resembling poetry in beauty or the evocation of feeling.

Famous quotes containing the word poetry:

    Poetry is concerned with using with abusing, with losing
    with wanting, with denying with avoiding with adoring
    with replacing the noun. It is doing that always
    doing that, doing that and doing nothing but that.
    Poetry is doing nothing but using losing refusing and
    pleasing and betraying and caressing nouns. That is
    what poetry does, that is what poetry has to do no
    matter what kind of poetry it is. And there are a
    great many kinds of poetry.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    Like a poetry lesson til sooner
    Or later it faltered at the line where
    —W.H. (Wystan Hugh)

    It is no longer possible for lyric poetry to express the immensity of our experience. Life has grown too cumbersome, too complicated. We have acquired values which are best expressed in prose.
    Boris Pasternak (1890–1960)