What is modern chemistry?

Some articles on chemistry, modern chemistry, modern:

Alchemist - Overview - Relation To The Science of Chemistry
... The alchemist Robert Boyle is credited as being the father of chemistry ... in favor of its younger offshoot chemistry, as it was renamed by Robert Boyle, the "father of modern chemistry" ... However, Boyle's biographers, in their emphasis that he laid the foundations of modern chemistry, neglect how steadily he clung to the scholastic sciences and to alchemy, in theory ...
History Of Physics - Influential Physicists
... of the Celestial Spheres) in 1543 - often considered the starting point of modern astronomy - in which he argued that the Earth and the other planets revolved around the Sun (heliocent ... on the conduction of electricity in gases Nikola Tesla (1856 - 1943) developer of modern alternating current (AC) flow, improved on the dynamo, patents and theoretical work formed the ... more than 300 scientific papers and over 150 non-scientific works, considered the "Father of Modern Physics" Niels Bohr (1885 - 1962) used quantum mechanical model (known as the Bohr model ...
List of Important Physicists
... the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres) in 1543 - often considered the starting point of modern astronomy - in which he argued that the Earth and the other ... Nikola Tesla (1856 - 1943) developer of modern alternating current (AC) flow, improved on the dynamo, patents and theoretical work formed the basis of wireless communication and the ...
Timeline Of Chemistry - 17th and 18th Centuries
... publishes the Tyrocinium Chymicum, an early chemistry textbook, and in it draws the first-ever chemical equation ... cited by some as a major transitional work between alchemy and chemistry, and as an important influence on Robert Boyle ... The Sceptical Chymist, a treatise on the distinction between chemistry and alchemy ...

Famous quotes containing the words chemistry and/or modern:

    Science with its retorts would have put me to sleep; it was the opportunity to be ignorant that I improved. It suggested to me that there was something to be seen if one had eyes. It made a believer of me more than before. I believed that the woods were not tenantless, but choke-full of honest spirits as good as myself any day,—not an empty chamber, in which chemistry was left to work alone, but an inhabited house,—and for a few moments I enjoyed fellowship with them.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    These modern ingenious sciences and arts do not affect me as those more venerable arts of hunting and fishing, and even of husbandry in its primitive and simple form; as ancient and honorable trades as the sun and moon and winds pursue, coeval with the faculties of man, and invented when these were invented. We do not know their John Gutenberg, or Richard Arkwright, though the poets would fain make them to have been gradually learned and taught.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)