What is John Milton?

  • (noun): English poet; remembered primarily as the author of an epic poem describing humanity's fall from grace (1608-1674).
    Synonyms: Milton

John Milton

John Milton (9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, a scholarly man of letters, and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost.

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Famous quotes containing the words john milton, milton and/or john:

    Let me obtain forgiveness of thee, Samson,
    Afford me place to shew what recompence
    Towards thee I intend for what I have misdone,
    Misguided; only what remains past cure
    Bear not too sensibly, nor still insist
    To afflict thy self in vain: though sight be lost,
    Life yet hath many solaces, enjoy’d
    Where other senses want not their delights
    At home in leisure and domestic ease,
    John Milton (1608–1674)

    “. . . Me miserable! which way shall I fly
    Infinite wrath and infinite despair?
    Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell;
    And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep
    Still threat’ning to devour me opens wide,
    To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heaven.
    —John Milton (1608–1674)

    Quintilian [educational writer in Rome about A.D. 100] hoped that teachers would be sensitive to individual differences of temperament and ability. . . . Beating, he thought, was usually unnecessary. A teacher who had made the effort to understand his pupil’s individual needs and character could probably dispense with it: “I will content myself with saying that children are helpless and easily victimized, and that therefore no one should be given unlimited power over them.”
    —C. John Sommerville (20th century)