What is human geography?

Human Geography

Human geography is one of the two major sub-fields of the discipline of geography. Human geography is a branch of the social sciences that studies the world, its people, communities, and cultures with an emphasis on relations of and across space and place. Human geography differs from physical geography mainly in that it has a greater focus on studying human activities and is more receptive to qualitative research methodologies. As a discipline, human geography is particularly diverse with respect to its methods and theoretical approaches to study.

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Some articles on human geography:

Jasper High School (Plano, Texas) - Students
... had the highest percentage of passing students in the world on the Advanced Placement Human Geography exam for schools of its size ... highest percentage of passing students in the world of the Advanced Placement Human Geography exam for schools of its size, with a 100% passing rate of the ...
Human Geography Journals
... As with all social sciences, human geographers publish research and other written work in a variety of academic journals ... Whilst human geography is interdisciplinary, there are a number of journals with a human geography focus ... These include Antipode Area Economic Geography Environment and Planning Geografiska Annaler Global Environmental Change Human and Policy Dimensions ...
Maputo City Province - Geography - Human Geography
... The city is divided into seven main administrative divisions ... Each of these consists of several smaller city quarters or bairros ...
Australasia - Human Geography
... In the past, Australasia has been used as a name for combined Australia/New Zealand sporting teams ... Examples include tennis between 1905 and 1915, when New Zealand and Australia combined to compete in the Davis Cup international tournament, and at the Olympic Games of 1908 and 1912 ...

Famous quotes containing the words geography and/or human:

    The totality of our so-called knowledge or beliefs, from the most casual matters of geography and history to the profoundest laws of atomic physics or even of pure mathematics and logic, is a man-made fabric which impinges on experience only along the edges. Or, to change the figure, total science is like a field of force whose boundary conditions are experience.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Magic is akin to science in that it always has a definite aim intimately associated with human instincts, needs, and pursuits. The magic art is directed towards the attainment of practical aims. Like other arts and crafts, it is also governed by a theory, by a system of principles which dictate the manner in which the act has to be performed in order to be effective.
    Bronislaw Malinowski (1984–1942)