What is harvard architecture?

Harvard Architecture

The Harvard architecture is a computer architecture with physically separate storage and signal pathways for instructions and data. The term originated from the Harvard Mark I relay-based computer, which stored instructions on punched tape (24 bits wide) and data in electro-mechanical counters. These early machines had data storage entirely contained within the central processing unit, and provided no access to the instruction storage as data. Programs needed to be loaded by an operator; the processor could not boot itself.

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Some articles on harvard architecture:

Modified Harvard Architecture - Harvard Architecture
... The original Harvard architecture computer, the Harvard Mark I, employed entirely separate memory systems to store instructions and data ... This is in contrast to a Von Neumann architecture computer, in which both instructions and data are stored in the same memory system and (without the ... is sometimes held to be the distinguishing feature of modern Harvard architecture computers ...
Modern Uses of The Harvard Architecture
... The principal advantage of the pure Harvard architecture—simultaneous access to more than one memory system—has been reduced by modified Harvard processors using modern ... Relatively pure Harvard architecture machines are used mostly in applications where tradeoffs, such as the cost and power savings from omitting caches, outweigh ... and data (SRAM) memory, with no cache, and take advantage of the Harvard architecture to speed processing by concurrent instruction and data access ...

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