What is grass over?

  • (verb): Cover with grass.
    Synonyms: grass

Some articles on grass:

Weapons Of Grass Destruction
... Weapons of Grass Destruction is the sixth full length album by American band Hayseed Dixie, released in 2007 ... The album's name continues the band's practice of adding the word grass to common phrases, in this case, weapons of mass destruction ...
Grass - Gallery
... A sea of neatly cut grass surrounds the bunkers at Filton Golf Club, Bristol Tall grass growing wild at Lyme Park In some places, even small areas of grass are valuable ... These steps were built to access grass for animal feed ...
Plains Pocket Mouse
... Some food found in their cheek pouches are seeds of needle grass (Stipa), bind weed, sandbur grass, a small bean (probably Astragulus), and sedge (Cyperus) ... Seeds of two species of pigeon grass, a few other grasses, and wild buckwheat have been found in their burrows ...
Brachyelytrum
... Brachyelytrum is a small grass genus that occurs in eastern North America and eastern Asia ... It is one of several grass species that displays this classic floristic disjunction pattern ... study has indicated that, within the grass family (Poaceae) Brachyleytrum is the sister-group of the subfamily Pooideae (the cool season grasses), a lineage that includes many of the world's major cereal ...
Echinochloa Crus-galli
... Echinochloa crus-galli is a type of wild grass originating from tropical Asia that was formerly classified as a type of panicum grass ... commonly known as Cockspur (or Cockspur Grass), Common Barnyard Grass, or simply "barnyard grass" (which may refer to any species of Echinochloa or the genus as a ...

Famous quotes containing the word grass:

    Walk in this faithless grass with studious tread,
    Lest mice, weasels, germane beasts, too soon
    The tall hat and eyes, the fierce feet, for dead
    Descry, and fix you prone in their revelling moon.
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    The slightest living thing answers a deeper need than all the works of man because it is transitory. It has an evanescence of life, or growth, or change: it passes, as we do, from one stage to the another, from darkness to darkness, into a distance where we, too, vanish out of sight. A work of art is static; and its value and its weakness lie in being so: but the tuft of grass and the clouds above it belong to our own travelling brotherhood.
    Freya Stark (b. 1893–1993)