What is fuel?

  • (noun): A substance that can be consumed to produce energy.
    Example: "More fuel is needed during the winter months"; "they developed alternative fuels for aircraft"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Fuel

Fuel is any material that stores energy that can later be extracted to perform mechanical work in a controlled manner. Most fuels used by humans undergo combustion, a redox reaction in which a combustible substance releases energy after it ignites and reacts with the oxygen in the air. Other processes used to convert fuel into energy include various other exothermic chemical reactions and nuclear reactions, such as nuclear fission or nuclear fusion. Fuels are also used in the cells of organisms in a process known as cellular respiration, where organic molecules are oxidized to release usable energy. Hydrocarbons are by far the most common source of fuel used by humans, but other substances, including radioactive metals, are also utilized.

Read more about Fuel.

Some articles on fuel:

Fuel (band)
... Fuel is an American rock band formed by guitarist/songwriter Carl Bell and bassist Jeff Abercrombie in 1989 ... Originally known as Small the Joy, they changed the group's name to Fuel sometime in 1994 ...
Zip Fuel - Description
... The ultimate fuel from a mass-to-performance perspective is hydrogen ... into the easily burnable hydrocarbon fuels ... beryllium have even higher energy content than carbon, but do not mix well to form a stable fuel that can be easily burned ...

More definitions of "fuel":

  • (verb): Stimulate.
    Example: "Fuel the debate on creationism"
  • (verb): Take in fuel, as of a ship.
    Example: "The tanker fueled in Bahrain"
  • (verb): Provide with a combustible substance that provides emergy.
    Example: "Fuel aircraft, ships, and cars"
  • (verb): Provide with fuel.
    Synonyms: fire

Famous quotes containing the word fuel:

    It is now many years that men have resorted to the forest for fuel and the materials of the arts: the New Englander and the New Hollander, the Parisian and the Celt, the farmer and Robin Hood, Goody Blake and Harry Gill; in most parts of the world, the prince and the peasant, the scholar and the savage, equally require still a few sticks from the forest to warm them and cook their food. Neither could I do without them.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    I had an old axe which nobody claimed, with which by spells in winter days, on the sunny side of the house, I played about the stumps which I had got out of my bean-field. As my driver prophesied when I was plowing, they warmed me twice,—once while I was splitting them, and again when they were on the fire, so that no fuel could give out more heat. As for the axe,... if it was dull, it was at least hung true.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Beware the/easy griefs, that fool and fuel nothing./It is too easy to cry “AFRIKA!”/and shock thy street,/and purse thy mouth,/and go home to thy “Gunsmoke,” to/thy “Gilligan’s Island” and the NFL.
    Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917)