What is free?

  • (adj): Unconstrained or not chemically bound in a molecule or not fixed and capable of relatively unrestricted motion.
    Example: "Free expansion"; "free oxygen"; "a free electron"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on free:

Free - People
... Ann Cottrell Free (1916–2004), American journalist Arthur M ... Free (1879–1953), American politician Doug Free (born 1984), American football offensive tackle Duncan Free (born 1973), Australian rower and Olympic medalist F ... William Free (1928–2003), American advertising executive Gavin Free (born 1988), English filmmaker James S ...
Harriet Tubman - Family and Marriage
... to Rit's children, and that any children born after she reached 45 years of age were legally free, but the Pattison and Brodess families had ignored this stipulation when they inherited the ... Around 1844, she married a free black man named John Tubman ... Such blended marriages - free people marrying enslaved people – were not uncommon on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, where by this time, half the black population was free ...
Qadariyah
... in Islam, are adherents of the doctrine of free will ... Qadaris maintain that Allah gave man free will, without which one cannot be fully accountable for one's actions ... Free will also means that Allah cannot know a man's actions in advance ...
École Normale Supérieure - Free Online Content
... Some lectures are in free access on the "Transfer of knowledge" site of the ENS ... About sixty books are in free access on the "Éditions Rue d'Ulm" site, all in French ...
Lambda Calculus - Formal Definition - Free and Bound Variables
... All other variables are called free ... expression y is a bound variable and x is free λy.x x y ... one single occurrence of x is bound by the second lambda λx.y (λx.z x) The set of free variables of a lambda expression, M, is denoted as FV(M) and is ...

More definitions of "free":

  • (adj): Not literal.
    Example: "A free translation of the poem"
    Synonyms: loose, liberal
  • (verb): Make (information) available publication.
    Synonyms: release
  • (verb): Free or remove obstruction from.
    Example: "Free a path across the cluttered floor"
    Synonyms: disengage
  • (noun): People who are free.
    Example: "The home of the free and the brave"
    Synonyms: free people
  • (verb): Free from obligations or duties.
    Synonyms: discharge
  • (verb): Remove or force out from a position.
    Example: "He finally could free the legs of the earthquake victim who was buried in the rubble"
    Synonyms: dislodge
  • (verb): Grant relief or an exemption from a rule or requirement to.
    Synonyms: exempt, relieve
  • (adv): Without restraint.
    Synonyms: loose
  • (adj): Able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint.
    Example: "Free enterprise"; "a free port"; "a free country"; "I have an hour free"; "free will"; "free of racism"; "feel free to stay as long as you wish"; "a free choice"
  • (adj): Not fixed in position.
    Example: "He pulled his arm free and ran"
    Synonyms: detached
  • (adj): Not occupied or in use.
    Example: "A free locker"; "a free lane"
  • (adj): Not taken up by scheduled activities.
    Example: "A free hour between classes"
    Synonyms: spare
  • (adj): Not held in servitude.
    Example: "After the Civil War he was a free man"

Famous quotes containing the word free:

    He writes free verse, I’m told, and he is thought
    To be the author of the Seven Freedoms:
    Free Will, Trade, Verse, Thought, Love, Speech, Coinage.
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    Openmindedness should not be fostered because, as Scripture teaches, Truth is great and will prevail, nor because, as Milton suggests, Truth will always win in a free and open encounter. It should be fostered for its own sake.
    Richard Rorty (b. 1931)

    If I had not come to America, where I felt free to formulate tentatively insights at which I had empathically arrived, I would have accomplished very little. I would never have begun to publish, to teach, to undertake research. Because if one does not find an assenting echo to one’s ideas, if one is passed over, as I was in Vienna, then one cannot create. To create, after all, is to believe that what one says will count.
    Margaret S. Mahler (1897–1985)