What is daughter?

  • (noun): A female human offspring.
    Example: "Her daughter cared for her in her old age"
    Synonyms: girl

Daughter

A daughter is a female offspring; a girl, woman, or female animal in relation to her parents. Daughterhood is the state of being a daughter. The masculine counterpart is a son. Analogously the name is used in several areas to show relations between groups or elements.

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Some articles on daughter:

Phoroneus
... An unnamed daughter of his is said to have consorted with Hecaterus ... Phoroneus, sometimes as his mother, sometimes as his daughter, or else, likely, as his consort (Kerenyi) ... Clement of Alexandria mentions Phthia, a daughter of Phoroneus, who became the mother of Achaeus by Zeus ...
Aglaea - Other Occurrences
... Aglaea, a daughter of Asclepius and Epione ... Aglaea, daughter of Mantineus ... Aglaea, daughter of Thespius and Megamede ...
Aglaulus
... Aglaulus, daughter of Actaeus, king of Athens ... Aglaulus, daughter of Cecrops, who was driven to suicide for ignoring a warning from the goddess Athena Aglaulus, daughter of an incestuous relationship between Erectheus and his daughter Procris ...
Amphiaraus
... who offered her the necklace of Harmonia, daughter of Aphrodite, once part of the bride-price of Cadmus, as a bribe for her advocacy ... as he fled across Greece, eventually landing at the court of King Phegeus, who gave him his daughter Alphesiboea in marriage ... Achelous himself, god of that river, promised him his daughter, Callirrhoe in marriage if Alcmaeon would retrieve the necklace and clothes which Eriphyle wore when she persuaded ...
Adrastus - Mythological Tradition
... He was married either to Amphithea, daughter of Pronax, or to Demonassa ... His daughters Argea and Deipyle married Polynices and Tydeus, respectively ... he states that Adrastus is the son of Talaus and Lysimache (daughter of Abas) ...

Famous quotes containing the word daughter:

    Having children can smooth the relationship, too. Mother and daughter are now equals. That is hard to imagine, even harder to accept, for among other things, it means realizing that your own mother felt this way, too—unsure of herself, weak in the knees, terrified about what in the world to do with you. It means accepting that she was tired, inept, sometimes stupid; that she, too, sat in the dark at 2:00 A.M. with a child shrieking across the hall and no clue to the child’s trouble.
    Anna Quindlen (20th century)

    Most people aren’t appreciated enough, and the bravest things we do in our lives are usually known only to ourselves. No one throws ticker tape on the man who chose to be faithful to his wife, on the lawyer who didn’t take the drug money, or the daughter who held her tongue again and again. All this anonymous heroism.
    Peggy Noonan (b. 1950)

    In the woods of Powhatan,
    Still ‘tis told by Indian fires
    How a daughter of their sires
    Saved a captive Englishman.
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811–1863)