What is concept?

  • (noun): An abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances.
    Synonyms: conception, construct

Concept

A concept is a mental symbol, used to denote a class of things in the world. Concepts are mental representations that allows us to draw appropriate inferences about the type of entities we encounter in our everyday lives. Concepts do not encompass all mental representations, but are merely a subset of them. Concepts are the glue that bind entities in the world, and are distinct from 'conceptions', which are the beliefs that we hold about these entities. The use of concepts is necessary to cognitive processes such as categorization, memory, decision making, learning and inference.

Read more about Concept.

Some articles on concept:

Valorisation
... The valorisation or valorization of capital is a theoretical concept created by Karl Marx in his critique of political economy ... Similarly, Marx's specific concept refers both to the process whereby a capital value is conferred or bestowed on something, and to the increase in the value of a ... it is recognized that it denotes a highly specific economic concept, i.e ...
Concept - Etymology
... The term "concept" is traced back to 1554–60 (Latin conceptum - "something conceived"), but what is today termed "the classical theory of concepts" is the theory ... The meaning of "concept" is explored in mainstream information science, cognitive science, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind ... science contexts, especially, the term 'concept' is often used in unclear or inconsistent ways ...
GM Korea - Concept Cars
... Musiro Chevrolet Trax Chevrolet Beat Concept Chevrolet Groove Chevrolet Orlando Chevrolet Aveo RS Concept Chevrolet Miray ...

Famous quotes containing the word concept:

    The concept of a mental state is primarily the concept of a state of the person apt for bringing about a certain sort of behaviour.
    David Malet Armstrong (b. 1926)

    The concept is interesting: to see, as though reflected
    In streaming windowpanes, the look of others through
    Their own eyes.
    John Ashbery (b. 1927)

    Modern man, if he dared to be articulate about his concept of heaven, would describe a vision which would look like the biggest department store in the world, showing new things and gadgets, and himself having plenty of money with which to buy them. He would wander around open-mouthed in this heaven of gadgets and commodities, provided only that there were ever more and newer things to buy, and perhaps that his neighbors were just a little less privileged than he.
    Erich Fromm (1900–1980)