What is Bernard?

  • (noun): French physiologist noted for research on secretions of the alimentary canal and the glycogenic function of the liver (1813-1878).
    Synonyms: Claude Bernard

Bernard

The masculine given name Bernard is of Germanic origin.

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Some articles on Bernard:

Pierre-Marie-Charles De Bernard Du Grail De La Villette
... Pierre-Marie-Charles de Bernard du Grail de la Villette (24 February 1804 – 6 March 1850), better known simply as Charles de Bernard, was a French writer ...
Pierre-Marie-Charles De Bernard Du Grail De La Villette - Writing
... Bernard had published a volume of odes 'Plus Deuil que Joie' (1838), which was not much noticed, but a series of stories in the same year gained him the reputation ... Bernard wrote two comedies in collaboration with "Léonce" (Charles-Henri-Ladislas Laurençot, 1805–1862) ... A collection of Bernard's complete works in 12 volumes was published after his death ...
Émile Bernard - Theories On Style and Art: Cloisonnism and Symbolism
... Bernard theorized a style of painting with bold forms separated by dark contours which became known as cloisonnism ... Many say that it was Bernard's friend Anquetin, who should receive the credit for this "closisonisme" technique ... During the spring of 1887, Bernard and Anquetin "turned against Neo-Impressionism." It is also likely that Bernard was influenced by the works he had seen of Cézanne ...
Bernard Binlin Dadié
... Bernard Binlin Dadié (or sometimes Bernard Dadie) (born 1916 near Abidjan) is a prolific Ivorian novelist, playwright, poet, and ex-administrator ...

Famous quotes containing the word bernard:

    I lay my eternal curse on whomsoever shall now or at any time hereafter make schoolbooks of my works and make me hated as Shakespeare is hated. My plays were not designed as instruments of torture. All the schools that lust after them get this answer, and will never get any other.
    —George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    Whenever an obviously well founded statement is made in England by a person specially well acquainted with the facts, that unlucky person is instantly and frantically contradicted by all the people who obviously know nothing about it.
    —George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    The degree of tolerance attainable at any moment depends on the strain under which society is maintaining its cohesion.
    —George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)