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Arthur Dent

Arthur Philip Dent is a fictional character and the hapless protagonist of the comic science fiction series The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.

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Some articles on arthur dent:

Benjy Mouse - Prak
... Prak recalled that many of the weird bits involved frogs or Arthur Dent ... As a result, when Arthur Dent came to visit him in search of the truth, he nearly died laughing ... the address of God's Last Message to His Creation, which he gave to Arthur when the laughter subsided ...
Prak
... Prak recalled that many of the weird bits involved frogs or Arthur Dent ... As a result, when Arthur Dent came to visit him in search of the truth, he nearly died laughing ... it, but did recall the address of God's Last Message to His Creation, which he gave to Arthur when the laughter subsided ...
Arthur Dent - Arthur's "Death"
... Arthur dies in the fifth installment of the book series, Mostly Harmless, in a club called Beta (owned by Stavro Mueller) when the Earth and all its duplicates are simultaneously destroyed by the ... written by Eoin Colfer, Arthur was put into a dream sequence and then frozen in time by the Guide Mk.2 ... All alternative Arthurs are killed though, and Arthur is later left stranded on a beach planet about to be destroyed by Vogons ...
Benjy Mouse - Mr Prosser
... roadbuilder who would like to do his job building a bypass right through Arthur Dent's house ... He unfailingly addresses Arthur as "Mr ... Dent." After some negotiation with Ford Prefect (or with Arthur Dent, in the radio series only), he is temporarily persuaded to halt the demolition ...

Famous quotes containing the words dent and/or arthur:

    Now only a dent in the earth marks the site of these dwellings, with buried cellar stones, and strawberries, raspberries, thimble-berries, hazel-bushes, and sumachs growing in the sunny sward there.... These cellar dents, like deserted fox burrows, old holes, are all that is left where once were the stir and bustle of human life, and “fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute,” in some form and dialect or other were by turns discussed.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.
    —Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930)