What is approach?

  • (verb): Come near or verge on, resemble, come nearer in quality, or character.
    Example: "His playing approaches that of Horowitz"
    Synonyms: border on
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on approach:

Bee Learning And Communication - Timing in Color Learning
... a rewarded dish at different stages of the honey bee feeding process during approach, feeding and departure ... experiment revealed that bees register color during both the approach and feeding stages of the exposure process ... bees usually remember best when the stimulus is present for about three seconds during the approach and two seconds after landing and beginning to feed ...
The Nature Conservancy - Approach
... The Nature Conservancy takes a scientific approach to conservation, selecting the areas it seeks to preserve based on analysis of what is needed to ensure the preservation of the local ...
Event Management Budget
... One approach is telling you on mathematical models, and the other on people ... The companies that adhere to this approach have their managers develop their own budgets ... would say that they do both, in reality the investment of time and money falls squarely in one approach or the other ...
Management Consulting - Approaches
... somewhere along a continuum, with an 'expert' or prescriptive approach at one end, and a facilitative approach at the other ... In the expert approach, the consultant takes the role of expert, and provides expert advice or assistance to the client, with, compared to the facilitative approach, less input from, and ... With a facilitative approach, the consultant focuses less on specific or technical expert knowledge, and more on the process of consultation itself ...
Katowice International Airport - Accidents and Incidents
27 October 2007, a Boeing 737-800 chartered by the UN destroyed dozens of approach and landing lights whilst making a low approach ... No passengers were injured, but the approach lights were out of service for three weeks ...

More definitions of "approach":

  • (noun): A close approximation.
    Example: "The nearest approach to genius"
  • (noun): The event of one object coming closer to another.
    Synonyms: approaching
  • (noun): Ideas or actions intended to deal with a problem or situation.
    Example: "His approach to every problem is to draw up a list of pros and cons"
    Synonyms: attack, plan of attack
  • (verb): Make advances to someone, usually with a proposal or suggestion.
    Example: "I was approached by the President to serve as his adviser in foreign matters"
  • (verb): Come near in time.
    Synonyms: come near
  • (noun): A relatively short golf shot intended to put the ball onto the putting green.
    Example: "He lost the hole when his approach rolled over the green"
    Synonyms: approach shot
  • (noun): The act of drawing spatially closer to something.
    Example: "The hunter's approach scattered the geese"
    Synonyms: approaching, coming
  • (verb): Begin to deal with.
    Example: "Approach a task"; "approach a new project"
    Synonyms: set about, go about
  • (noun): A tentative suggestion designed to elicit the reactions of others.
    Synonyms: overture, advance, feeler
  • (noun): A way of entering or leaving.
    Synonyms: access
  • (noun): The temporal property of becoming nearer in time.
    Example: "The approach of winter"
    Synonyms: approaching, coming

Famous quotes containing the word approach:

    The modern world needs people with a complex identity who are intellectually autonomous and prepared to cope with uncertainty; who are able to tolerate ambiguity and not be driven by fear into a rigid, single-solution approach to problems, who are rational, foresightful and who look for facts; who can draw inferences and can control their behavior in the light of foreseen consequences, who are altruistic and enjoy doing for others, and who understand social forces and trends.
    Robert Havighurst (20th century)

    I maintain that Truth is a pathless land, and you cannot approach it by any path whatsoever, by any religion, by any sect.
    Jiddu Krishnamurti (1895–1986)

    Girls tend to attribute their failures to factors such as lack of ability, while boys tend to attribute failure to specific factors, including teachers’ attitudes. Moreover, girls avoid situations in which failure is likely, whereas boys approach such situations as a challenge, indicating that failure differentially affects self-esteem.
    Michael Lewis (late–20th-century)