What is anaesthetic machine?

Anaesthetic Machine

The anaesthetic machine (UK English) or anesthesia machine (US English) is used by anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists, and anaesthesiologist assistants to support the administration of anaesthesia. The most common type of anaesthetic machine in use in the developed world is the continuous-flow anaesthetic machine, which is designed to provide an accurate and continuous supply of medical gases (such as oxygen and nitrous oxide), mixed with an accurate concentration of anaesthetic vapour (such as isoflurane), and deliver this to the patient at a safe pressure and flow. Modern machines incorporate a ventilator, suction unit, and patient monitoring devices.

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Some articles on anaesthetic machine:

Anaesthetic Machine - Anesthesia Machine Vs Anesthesia Cart
... The Anesthesia machine contains mechanical respiratory support (ventilator) and O2 support as well as being a means for administering anesthetic gases which may be used for sedation as well as total ...
Boyle's Machine - Safety Features of Modern Machines
... Based on experience gained from analysis of mishaps, the modern anaesthetic machine incorporates several safety devices, including an oxygen failure alarm (aka 'Oxygen Failure ... In older machines this was a pneumatic device called a Ritchie whistle which sounds when oxygen pressure is 38 psi descending ... Newer machines have an electronic sensor ...
Boyle's Machine
... The anaesthetic machine (UK English) or anesthesia machine (US English) or Boyle's machine is used by anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists, and anaesthesiologist assistants to support the ... The most common type of anaesthetic machine in use in the developed world is the continuous-flow anaesthetic machine, which is designed to provide an accurate and continuous ... Modern machines incorporate a ventilator, suction unit, and patient monitoring devices ...

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