What are terms?

  • (noun): The amount of money needed to purchase something.
    Example: "He got his new car on excellent terms"
    Synonyms: price, damage
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on terms:

Uses Of Trigonometry - Some Modern Uses - Solving Non-trigonometric Equations
... equation with constant coefficients has solutions expressed in terms of the eigenvalues of its characteristic equation if some of the eigenvalues are complex, the complex terms can be replaced by trigonometric ... that it contains cube roots of complex numbers again an alternative solution exists in terms of trigonometric functions of real terms ...
Governor Of New Jersey
... for which elected officials serve four year terms ... While individual politicians may serve as many terms as they can be elected to, Governors cannot be elected to more than two consecutive terms ...
Eric Rudolph - Arrest and Guilty Plea
... The terms of the plea agreement were that Rudolph would be sentenced to four consecutive life terms ... He was officially sentenced July 18, 2005, to two consecutive life terms without parole for the 1998 murder of a police officer ... for his various bombings in Atlanta on August 22, 2005, receiving three consecutive life terms ...
John Davies (poet) - Legacy
... In political terms, Davies was significant in his work on constitutional law and in framing the terms of the Plantation of Ulster, a model that served the English crown as it extended its colonial reach in ... In literary terms, he was a fine poet who lay quite neglected from the mid-17th century, until his cause was championed by T ...

More definitions of "terms":

  • (noun): Status with respect to the relations between people or groups.
    Example: "On good terms with her in-laws"
    Synonyms: footing

Famous quotes containing the word terms:

    The great pagan world of which Egypt and Greece were the last living terms ... once had a vast and perhaps perfect science of its own, a science in terms of life. In our era this science crumbled into magic and charlatanry. But even wisdom crumbles.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    ... the constructive power of an image is not measured in terms of its truth, but of the love it inspires.
    Sarah Patton Boyle, U.S. civil rights activist and author. The Desegregated Heart, part 1, ch. 15 (1962)

    As for the virtuous poor, one can pity them, of course, but one cannot possibly admire them. They have made private terms with the enemy, and sold their birthright for very bad pottage. They must also be extraordinarily stupid.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)