What are consequences?

Some articles on consequences:

Syndemic - Cooccurrence Versus Syndemism
... on communities experiencing co-occurring epidemics that additively increase negative health consequences." Consequently, it is possible for two afflictions to be comorbid, but not be syndemic (i.e ... occurs but it has beneficial rather than deleterious consequences ... disease interactions, including their causes and consequences for human life and well-being ...
Altruism (ethics) - As Consequentialist Ethics
... of consequentialism, as it indicates that an action is ethically right if it brings good consequences to others ... James Fieser states the altruist dictum as "An action is morally right if the consequences of that action are more favorable than unfavorable to everyone except the agent." Altruism may be seen as similar to ...
High-stakes Testing - Definitions
... In common usage, a high-stakes test is any test that has major consequences or is the basis of a major decision ... who pass and those who fail, and has direct consequences for passing or failing (something "at stake") ... at some schools, many people believe that it has consequences for doing well or poorly and is therefore a high-stakes test under the simpler, common definition ...

Famous quotes containing the word consequences:

    Cultivate the habit of thinking ahead, and of anticipating the necessary and immediate consequences of all your actions.... Likewise in your pleasures, ask yourself what such and such an amusement leads to, as it is essential to have an objective in everything you do. Any pastime that contributes nothing to bodily strength or to mental alertness is a totally ridiculous, not to say, idiotic, pleasure.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)

    If you are prepared to accept the consequences of your dreams ... then you must still regard America today with the same naive enthusiasm as the generations that discovered the New World.
    Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929)

    There is a delicate balance of putting yourself last and not being a doormat and thinking of yourself first and not coming off as selfish, arrogant, or bossy. We spend the majority of our lives attempting to perfect this balance. When we are successful, we have many close, healthy relationships. When we are unsuccessful, we suffer the natural consequences of damaged and sometimes broken relationships. Children are just beginning their journey on this important life lesson.
    —Cindy L. Teachey. “Building Lifelong Relationships—School Age Programs at Work,” Child Care Exchange (January 1994)