Web Query Classification

Web Query Classification

Web query topic classification/categorization is a problem in information science. The task is to assign a Web search query to one or more predefined categories, based on its topics. The importance of query classification is underscored by many services provided by Web search. A direct application is to provide better search result pages for users with interests of different categories. For example, the users issuing a Web queryapple” might expect to see Web pages related to the fruit apple, or they may prefer to see products or news related to the computer company. Online advertisement services can rely on the query classification results to promote different products more accurately. Search result pages can be grouped according to the categories predicted by a query classification algorithm. However, the computation of query classification is non-trivial. Different from the document classification tasks, queries submitted by Web search users are usually short and ambiguous; also the meanings of the queries are evolving over time. Therefore, query topic classification is much more difficult than traditional document classification tasks.

Read more about Web Query ClassificationKDDCUP 2005, Difficulties, Applications, See Also

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Web Query Classification - See Also
... Document classification Web search query Information retrieval Query expansion Naive Bayes classifier Support vector machines Meta search Vertical search Online advertising ...

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