Wakefulness - Maintenance By The Brain

Maintenance By The Brain

The posterior hypothalamus plays a key role in the maintenance of the cortical activation that underlies wakefulness. Several systems originating in this part of the brain control the shift from wakefulness into sleep and sleep into wakefulness. Histamine neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus and nearby adjacent posterior hypothalamus project to the entire brain and are the most wake-selective system so far identified in the brain. Another key system is that provided by the orexins (also known as hypocretins) projecting neurons. These exist in areas adjacent to histamine neurons and like them project widely to most brain areas and associate with arousal. Orexin deficiency has been identified as responsible for narcolepsy.

Research suggests that orexin and histamine neurons play distinct, but complementary roles in controlling wakefulness with orexin being more involved with wakeful behavior and histamine cognition and activation of cortical EEG.

It has been suggested the fetus is not awake with wakeness occurring in the newborn due to the stress of being born and the associated activation of the locus coeruleus.

Read more about this topic:  Wakefulness

Other articles related to "maintenance by the brain, maintenance, the brain, brain":

Awake? (Zao Album) - Maintenance By The Brain
... The posterior hypothalamus plays a key role in the maintenance of the cortical activation that underlies wakefulness ... Several systems originating in this part of the brain control the shift from wakefulness into sleep and sleep into wakefulness ... nucleus and nearby adjacent posterior hypothalamus project to the entire brain and are the most wake-selective system so far identified in the brain ...

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