Vladimir Lenin - in Popular Culture - Television

Television

  • Lenin was portrayed by Patrick Stewart in the 1974 BBC miniseries Fall of Eagles.
  • Lenin was portrayed by Kenneth Cranham in the 1983 BBC miniseries Reilly: Ace of Spies.
  • Lenin was portrayed by Ben Kingsley in the 1988 television film Lenin: The Train.
  • Lenin was portrayed by Maximilian Schell in the 1992 HBO television film Stalin

Read more about this topic:  Vladimir Lenin, In Popular Culture

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Famous quotes containing the word television:

    Addison DeWitt: Your next move, it seems to me, should be toward television.
    Miss Caswell: Tell me this. Do they have auditions for television?
    Addison DeWitt: That’s all television is, my dear. Nothing but auditions.
    Joseph L. Mankiewicz (1909–1993)

    Cultural expectations shade and color the images that parents- to-be form. The baby product ads, showing a woman serenely holding her child, looking blissfully and mysteriously contented, or the television parents, wisely and humorously solving problems, influence parents-to-be.
    Ellen Galinsky (20th century)

    All television ever did was shrink the demand for ordinary movies. The demand for extraordinary movies increased. If any one thing is wrong with the movie industry today, it is the unrelenting effort to astonish.
    Clive James (b. 1939)