Very Low-density Lipoprotein

Very Low-density Lipoprotein

Very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) is a type of lipoprotein made by the liver. VLDL is one of the five major groups of lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL, low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein) that enable fats and cholesterol to move within the water-based solution of the bloodstream. VLDL is assembled in the liver from triglycerides, cholesterol, and apolipoproteins. VLDL is converted in the bloodstream to low-density lipoprotein (LDL). VLDL particles have a diameter of 30-80 nm. VLDL transports endogenous products, whereas chylomicrons transport exogenous (dietary) products.

Read more about Very Low-density Lipoprotein:  Function, Changes During Circulation

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Very Low-density Lipoprotein - Changes During Circulation
... apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) and additional apoE donated from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ... Once in circulation, VLDL will come in contact with lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the capillary beds in the body (adipose, cardiac, and skeletal muscle) ... and CETP enzymes, the composition of the molecule changes, and it becomes intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) ...