Vermont Route 100

Vermont Route 100 (VT 100) is a north–south state highway in Vermont in the United States. Running through the center of the state, it travels nearly the entire length of Vermont and is 216.59 miles (349 km) long. VT 100 is the state's longest state highway, the longest north-south route in Vermont, and the longest numbered highway in Vermont of any type.

Read more about Vermont Route 100:  Route Description, Major Intersections

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Famous quotes containing the words route and/or vermont:

    A route differs from a road not only because it is solely intended for vehicles, but also because it is merely a line that connects one point with another. A route has no meaning in itself; its meaning derives entirely from the two points that it connects. A road is a tribute to space. Every stretch of road has meaning in itself and invites us to stop. A route is the triumphant devaluation of space, which thanks to it has been reduced to a mere obstacle to human movement and a waste of time.
    Milan Kundera (b. 1929)

    In order to get to East Russet you take the Vermont Central as far as Twitchell’s Falls and change there for Torpid River Junction, where a spur line takes you right into Gormley. At Gormley you are met by a buckboard which takes you back to Torpid River Junction again.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)