Venezuelan Spanish - Some Examples of Spanish Words Common in Venezuela, Including Some Native Venezuelanisms (slang)

Some Examples of Spanish Words Common in Venezuela, Including Some Native Venezuelanisms (slang)

  • Achanta'o/Achantá = adj. A person of slow thought or slow reasoning. Someone passive, or lacking seduction skills.
  • Amapuche = n. A passionate demonstration of affection. A warm hug.
  • Amuñuñar = v. To tightly yet disorderly put things together.
  • Agarrado(a) = adj. Selfish. See Pichirre.
  • Alborotado = adj. To be excited or in a frenzy.
  • Arepa = n. Armpit sweat marks. In Baseball it can also mean a score of zero. Lit. Venezuelan corn bread bun.
  • Arrapado = adj. Excited (profane).
  • Arrecharse = v. To get angry (profane).
  • Arrecho = adj. Superlative attribute for an object or situation, namely extremely good, bad or difficult (profane). There are differences if someone is arrecho in a limited period of time (be angry) o if someone is arrecho all the time (has a difficult character or personality). On the other hand, if something is arrecho, is very good. "Qué arrecha estuvo la fiesta" (how good was the party). It also has a superlative, "arrechísimo" (extremely good, bad or angry, depending of the context).
  • Arrecochinar = v. To gather people disorderly in a small space.
  • Arrocear = v. To turn up at a party without being invited.
  • Arrocero = n. Party crasher.
  • Bachaco = n. A blond or redhead mulatto. Lit. Leafcutter ant.
  • Bajarse de la mula = exp. To pay for something. To be demanded for money. To be robbed. Lit. "To get off the mule".
  • Bajáte de esa mata e' coco = exp. To get your heads out of the clouds. Lit. "To get off that coconut tree."
  • Bala fría = n. Junk food. A quick snack. Lit. "Cold bullet".
  • Balurdo = adj. or n. (from French Balourd) An awkward or ridiculous person. A low-class person or behavior. See Chimbo
  • Barrio = n. Poor neighborhood. Often built upwards on hillsides, they are a distinct and noticeable feature of the landscape in large cities in Venezuela.
  • Becerro = n. A goofy person. Lit. To calf. Example: "Si eres Becerro" = You're such a goofy.
  • Bicha = adj. of bitchy behavior, foxy lady, vixen.
  • Birra = n. Beer.
  • Bochinche = n. A gathering or noisy party. Disorder, chaos, but usually in a funny way.
  • Bolo = n. A single unit of Venezuelan currency. Similar to calling the U.S. Dollar a "buck."
  • Bolsa = n. (or Bolsiclón) a moron.
  • Bucear = v. To ogle discreetly. To peep furtively. Lit. To skin dive.
  • Bululú = n. A fuss. A place in which there is a noisy crowd, and not always partying.
  • Burda = adv. or adj. (superlative) Very much. Example: "Caminamos burda" = We walked a lot. "Ella es burda de linda" = she's very pretty.
  • Buzo = n. Peeper.
  • Cachapera = n. A lesbian (pejorative). Lit. woman who makes Cachapas.
  • Cacharro = n. Old, worn out vehicle. A piece of junk.
  • Cachicamo = n. Armadillo.
  • Cachúo = adj. Someone who has been cheated on by his partner. Lit. with horns (See cuckold.) In Zulia,being "cachúo" is having a penis erection. (profane).
  • Caerse a palos = exp. To engage in heavy drinking. To get drunk. Lit. "To fall with sticks". See "Palos".
  • Calarse = v. To tolerate something bad.
  • Calienta huevo = A girl that insinuates sexual interest but at the end doesn't do anything.
  • Cambur = n. A well remunarated job in government. Lit. Banana.
  • Caña = n. Booze, an alcoholic drink. Also, it's often referred as "curda".
  • Carajo(a) = n. A dude (profane). Lit. Crow's nest.
  • Carajazo = n. See Coñazo (profane).
  • Carajito(a) = n. A kid (sometimes pejorative). Diminutive of "Carajo".
  • Caraotas = n. Beans. In Venezuela, Caraotas are black by default. Should beans be of a different color, the name of the color must be used. Example: "Caraotas blancas" = white beans, "Caraotas rojas" = red beans.
  • Catire(a) = adj. or n. Generic for a beer. Also a nickname for the sun. Derived from the literal meaning of catire as blond person.
  • Chamo(a) = n. Boy/girl. With suffix -ito: a kid; also means son or daughter. Venezuelans are well known among Spanish speakers for their love and constant use of this word, which is used repeatedly in the same fashion as the American slang dude.
  • Chao = exp. (from the Italian "ciao") To bid farewell, similar to "bye".
  • Chaparro = n. Slang for penis. See "Güevo". Lit. Short person, shorty.
  • Chévere = adj. Fine, cool.
  • Chimbo(a) = adj. Lousy. Of low quality. Bootleg. Ill made. Fake. Uncool.
  • Chino(a) = n. Andean expression for a boy or girl, particularly in the Trujillo State. Lit. Chinese person.
  • Chivo = n. The Boss, someone at a high position in an organization. Lit. Goat. Example: "El Chivo que más mea" (The goat who pisses the most) = the most important person.
  • Chulo = n. Person who lives from/takes advantage from others, often financially. Lit. pimp.
  • Churupo(s) = n. Money.
  • Chola = n./adj. Flip-flops/Slippers. Accelerator pedal. Also means "speedy", for example: "Dale chola!" (Hurry up!!) or "Yo iba demasiado chola" (I was going too fast). A popular radio personality in Venezuela has the nickname "Full Chola" (Speedy)
  • Choro = n. Thief, robber (pejorative).
  • Coger cola pa'l (para el) cielo = exp. Masculine masturbation (profane). Lit. Hitchhike to heaven.
  • Coñazo = n. A violent hit or strike (profane).
  • ¡Coño! = exp. Damn! (somewhat profane, widely used).
  • Coño de madre = n. A rotten bastard. (profane). Lit. "His mother's cunt".
  • ¡Coño de la madre! = exp. "Oh, my fucking God!", used to denote high frustration and anger (very profane). Lit. "Mother's cunt!"
  • Compinche = n. Partner, friend, or buddy.
  • Contorno = n. A side dish. From Italian.
  • Corotos = n. Stuff, belongings. Word derives from Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot's last name.
  • Costilla = n. An affectionate way of a man to name his female partner. The term is a reference to the origin of Eve. Lit. Rib.
  • Criollo = n. A local. A native of Venezuela. Something typically native. Lit. Creole.
  • Cuaima = n. A very jealous/possessive and untrusting wife/girlfriend. Lit. Bushmaster (a kind of poisonous snake).
  • Culo = n. A young woman, not necessarily the girlfriend, but a good-looking one a man usually dates, goes out with or has sex with (profane). Lit. Ass.
  • Culillo = n. Lots of fear (profane). Lit. Small Ass.
  • Curdo = adj. Drunk.
  • De pinga = exp. Cool, superb, excellent (profane). See "Pepiado".
  • Epa/Épale = exp. Hi or Hello (informal greeting; "What's up"). Close to the Lit. Hey.
  • Fajado = n. Someone who works pretty hard/much on something. No matter if it's weekend or holiday, this person will work anyways. See Fajarse.
  • Fajarse = v. To work the hardest on something until getting it done. Example: "¡Tienes que fajarte con eso!" = You have to work very hard on that!
  • Fino = n. Fine. adjective. Example: "Eso esta fino" = that is fine.
  • Filo = n. Hunger. Lit. Edge. Example: "Llevo el filo parejo" = it dose not has translation.
  • Franela = n. T-shirt.
  • Fregar = v. To suffer the consequences of a wrong decision. To annoy. To kill. To scrub.
  • Fumado = adj. or n. Stoned. Crazy, disheveled, difficult to understand. Lit. past participle of the verb "fumar", to smoke.
  • Gafo = adj. or n. Dumb or stupid, comes for the Italian word "cafone" or "gavone" which means dumb peasant.
  • Gargajo = n. Spit, a loogie.
  • Gocho = adj. or n. A native of the Andean parts of Venezuela, particularly the states of Mérida, Táchira or Trujillo.
  • Golilla = adj. or n. Thing of low commercial value, easy to buy or acquire (colloquial form of the word cheap). Example: "que barato, una golilla!" = what a bargain, that is so cheap!.
  • Gringo = n. American.
  • Guachicón = n. (Northeastern Venezuelan usage) An athletic shoe, sneaker.
  • Guachimán = n. A vigilant o guard, derived from "watch man".
  • Guáramo = n. Iron will. Courage.
  • Guasa = n. To make fun of something or someone.
  • Guasacaca = n. A sauce made from avocados and spices. Resembles Mexican Guacamole.
  • Guaro = n. A native of Lara state.
  • Guayabo = n. To be romantically disillusioned. To have the Blues. Lit. Tree of the guava fruit.
  • Guayoyo = n. Slightly watered down black coffee. Commonly served after meals.
  • Güevo = n. Dick, penis. Nuisance (profane). Derives from Huevo (Egg).
  • Huevón (or Güebón) = n. Sucker, asshole, stupid (profane).
  • Huele Verga = n. See Huevón.
  • Hablame el mío/Hablame la mía = exp. Similar to "What's up?" or "What's going on?". Lit. Talk to me dude/Talk to me girl. Used only by marginal people.
  • Igualado(a) = adj. A demeaning term to describe someone who pretends to be of a superior financial/intellectual level than the person really is.
  • Jalar Bola = v. To abuse flattering. Sweet talking, intended to get benefit from someone with selfish purposes. Similar to the expression "scratch your back". Lit. To Pull Ball.
  • Jamón = n. A French kiss. Something very easy to do. A nice girl. Lit. Ham
  • Jeva = n. Woman.
  • Latas = v. To make out. Darse las Latas. Lit. "to give each other the cans"
  • Lambucio = n. A glutton. To request food or goods in a rude way.
  • Ladilla = adj. or n. Something annoying or boring. A boring or annoying person. Lit. Crab louse.
  • Macundales = n. Gear, stuff. Derived from the brand "Mac and Dale" (a belt to carry tools used by the oil industry workers in Venezuela). See Corotos.
  • Malandro = n. Gangster, thug, thief, burglar, robber.
  • Mamar = v. (In the continuous tense) To be penniless. Example: "Estar Mamando". (In the past participle tense) To be tired. Example: "Estar Mamado". Lit. To Suck.
  • Mamahuevo = n. (or Mamagüevo) Cocksucker. A hustler (profane).
  • Mamarracho = n. Someone who makes things of a very bad quality. adj. Badly done.
  • Manganzón = n. A lazy person.
  • Maracucho = n. (or Marabino) A native of Maracaibo or its neighborhoods.
  • Marico = n. Commonly used as 'dude' between friends. 'Marica' may also be used between girl friends (profane/pejorative). Lit. A gay man.
  • Mariquera = n. (or Maricada) A little thing. A non-transcendental fact. A synonym for Vaina.
  • Matar un tigre = exp. To moonlight. To have a temporary job. Lit. "To kill a tiger".
  • Matraquear = v. To blackmail, to demand compensation in exchange of something, especially by corrupt cops.
  • Mojón = n. A piece of defecation. A lie.
  • Mojonero = n. Liar. Person who propagates "mojones". See above.
  • Musiú = n. (from French Monsieur) A foreigner. A white person from a non-Hispanic country. Used to describe someone not familiar with local Venezuelan customs, awkward. "Hacerse el musiú" ("pass as a foreigner") is an expression used when someone pretends that he/she does not understand a situation to avoid involvement.
  • ¡Na' Guará! = exp. An expression to denote surprise, bewilderment. Most commonly used in Lara state.
  • Negrear = v. To treat someone badly, to forget somebody, as an allusion to when black people were victims of racism. Despite its origin, nowadays the term has no racist undertone. Any person can say the word to another one regardless of the color of their skin. Example: "Me negrearon" = they treated me badly, they forgot me.
  • Nevera = n. Derived from the first brand of refrigerators "New-Era".
  • Niche = adj. See "Chimbo(a)". Of low class.
  • No joda = exp. (or Nojoda). Venezuelan equivalent of the English curse word "Goddammit" (profane).
  • Nota = n. Something nice, neat, or pleasant. A drug trip, to be "high". Lit. Note. Verbal form: Ennotarse.
  • O sea = exp. A form to say whatever or "I mean". A filler word. Lit. Or Like,. Example: "¿O sea, cómo lo hicíste?" (Like, how'd you do it!?).
  • Paja = n. Bullshit. "Hablar Paja" = to bullshit someone. "Hacerse la paja" = to masturbate (profane). Lit. Hay.
  • Pajizo(za) = adj. (from Paja) Someone who masturbates a lot (profane). Lit. Wanker.
  • Pajúo(a) = n. A loose synonym for Pendejo or Güevón.
  • Paisano = n. From the Italian "Paesano", meaning a Venezuelan or Italian (or southern European). Abbreviated as Paisa usually refers to a native of Colombia.
  • Paliza = n. See Rumba de Coñazos. See also Rumba de Palos.
  • Palo = n. Alcoholic beverage. Lit. Stick. Example: "¡Tómate un palito, pues!" = Have a little drink (then)!
  • Palo de agua = n. Torrential rain. Lit. Stick of water.
  • Pato = n. Gay man (pejorative). Lit. Duck.
  • Pana = n. Friend, buddy, dude. Interchangeable with Chamo.
  • Pantallero: n. A show-off, "Pantallear". v. To lavishly flash oneself or anything of value. Derived from Pantalla (Screen).
  • Papeado = adj. Of muscular or build. Buff. Derives from Papa (Potato).
  • Papear = v. To eat.
  • Parcha/Parchita= n. Gay man. Lit. Passion fruit.
  • Pargo = n. Gay man. Lit. Red Snapper.
  • Pasapalos = n. Appetizer. Snacks. Hors d'oeuvres.
  • Pava = n. Bad luck, ill omen.
  • Pavo, pava = adj. or n. Trendy or well dressed adolescent, kid, youngster. Lit. Turkey.
  • Peaje = n. Illegal fee. Lit. Toll. See also Bajarse de la mula.
  • Pelona = n. An impersonation of death. The Grim Reaper. Example: La pelona.
  • Pelúo = adj. Hard, very difficult. Lit. Hairy.
  • Perico = n. Venezuelan-style scrambled eggs. Also used to describe cocaine. Lit. Parakeet.
  • Pendejo = n. A pushover. See Huevón.
  • Peorro = adj. Mediocre, inferior (profane).
  • Pepiado adj. (or Pepeado) Cool, superb, excellent.
  • Perol = n. A coroto, a kettle.
  • Picado/Picada = adj. Ticked off, feeling upset (most likely after being insulted or proven wrong) while at the same time hiding or denying the feeling. Lit. Stung.
  • Picar = verb. To say or do something that would lead a person to become "Picado" o "Picada". Also, eat a snack. Lit. Sting, or Slice.
  • Pichirre = adj. Selfish, stingy, miser, cheap.
  • Pipi Frío = exp. Someone that has been single for a long time. Someone lacking social skills or uninteresting. Lit. "Cold Penis".
  • Plaga = n. A swarm of mosquitoes. A mischievous person, a pest. (See Rata).
  • Planetario(a) = adj. Crazy, insane. "No soy loco(a), soy planetario(a)"(I'm not crazy, I'm planetaruy), became a popular catch-phrase after it was used by a patient in a mental institute during the filming of a documentary.
  • Pollo/Polla = n. A childish, naive or immature person. Lit. Chicken.
  • Polvo = n. Coitus. Copulation. Lit. Dust.
  • Puta = n. Used in many cases to mean slut. Lit. whore, prostitute.
  • Queso = n. Sexual drive, Lust. Mostly applied to men. Lit. Cheese. Example: "Tengo queso" = I'm horny.
  • Quesúo = adj. To be horny, lustful.
  • Rabipelado = n. Opossum.
  • Rata = n. An evil or treacherous person. Lit. Rat.
  • Ratón = n. Hung over Lit. Mouse. Example: "Tengo ratón" = I've got a hangover.
  • Real or Rial = n. Money.
  • Rico(a) = adj. or n. An attractive person. Delicious, pleasurable. Lit. Rich.
  • Rumba = n. A party.
  • Rumba de Coñazos = exp. To violently and exaggeratedly hit or strike for a while (profane). Example: "¡Te voy a dar una rumba de coñazos!" = I'm gonna kick your ass/I'm gonna kill you.
  • Rumba de Palos = exp. To be beaten up. In a sports context, whenever a team wins over another with a large score.
  • Rumbero(a) = n. A partygoer.
  • Rancho = n. A precarious makeshift home found in barrios made out of whatever the builder may find, including cardboard, wood, metal rods, zinc sheets. These have a tendency to evolve into brick houses and often 3-story buildings as the owner acquires more materials. Lit. Ranch.
  • Santamaría = n. Rollup metal fence that covers the front part of a store when closed.
  • Sifrino = n. A wealthy, snobby, arrogant person. adj. Posh, applied to people and things, such as an accent or clothes.
  • Tequeño = n. A deep-fried flour roll filled with cheese, similar to cheese sticks. Lit. A native from the city of Los Teques.
  • Teta = n. A source of guaranteed income. Lit. Female breast.
  • Tigre = n. Second job or night job. See Matar tigre
  • Tripeo = n. Something very enjoyable. Example: "Que tripeo esta vaina" = This is really fun. Also used as a verb; "tripear."
  • Ubícate = exp. To get real. Lit. Locate yourself.
  • Vacilar = v. To enjoy something/have a good time. Example: "Estoy vacilando" = I am having fun. Also used as a noun: "Vacile," as in "qué malvacile" = What a bad time. Lit. Vacillate
  • Vaina = adj. or n. Thing, annoyance, problem, predicament, situation, endeavor, liaison. Vaina is one of the most versatile Venezuelan words, not necessarily having a negative connotation (mildly profane). Lit. Pod, sheath.
  • Verga = n. Male sexual organ. An exclamation to convey a feeling shock, disgust or alert. In the Western part of the country, especially in Zulia state, it is a nonsensical filler as an alternative to vaina.
  • Vergación = adj. superlative form of Verga.
  • Vergatario(a) = adj. For something excellent, or someone who has done something very well.
  • Yesquero = n. A lighter.
  • Zanahoria = n. Someone who zealously takes care of his/her own health. A vegetarian. A person that behaves well, nerd. Straight, clean. adj. A boring, dull person. Lit. Carrot.
  • Zancudo = n. Mosquito. Lit. "The one that walks on stilts" as a metaphor for the insect's long legs.
  • Zapatero = exp. To loose in a game with zero points. Lit. Shoemaker.
  • Zapato de goma = n. Sneakers. Lit. Rubber soled shoe.
  • Zapato de patente = n. Patent-leather shoe.
  • Zumba'o = adj. Forward, crazy, nutty, careless person.

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