Vanderbilt Law Review


The Vanderbilt Law Review is Vanderbilt University Law School's flagship academic journal. The law review is published six times per year. The Vanderbilt Law Review is 18th among general-topic law reviews, based upon the number of times its articles are cited.

Other articles related to "law, laws":

Roman Law - Roman Legal Development - The Twelve Tables
... The first legal text is the Law of the Twelve Tables, dating from mid-5th century BC ... Terentilius Arsa, proposed that the law should be written, in order to prevent magistrates from applying the law arbitrarily ... the patricians to send a delegation to Athens, to copy the Laws of Solon they also dispatched delegations to other Greek cities for like reason ...
Organic - Law
... Organic law, a fundamental law Organic statute, literally "regulations for an organ", with "organ" meaning an organization or governmental body Organic Articles, a French law presented in 1802 ...
Roman Law - Roman Legal Development
... the Twelve Tables (754–449 BC), private law comprised the Roman civil law (ius civile Quiritium) that applied only to Roman citizens, and was bonded to religion undeveloped, with attributes of strict formalism ... began their first activities without any fixed law, and without any fixed rights all things were ruled despotically, by kings" ... It is believed that Roman Law is rooted in the Etruscan religion, emphasising ritual ...

Famous quotes containing the words review, vanderbilt and/or law:

    The thanksgiving of the old Jew, “Lord, I thank Thee that Thou didst not make me a woman,” doubtless came from a careful review of the situation. Like all of us, he had fortitude enough to bear his neighbors’ afflictions.
    Frances A. Griffin, U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4, ch. 19, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902)

    We must learn which ceremonies may be breached occasionally at our convenience and which ones may never be if we are to live pleasantly with our fellow man.
    —Amy Vanderbilt (1908–1974)

    There is but one law for all, namely that law which governs all law, the law of our Creator, the law of humanity, justice, equity—the law of nature and of nations.
    Edmund Burke (1729–1797)