University of Utah College of Engineering

University Of Utah College Of Engineering

The College of Engineering at the University of Utah is an academic college of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah. The college offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in engineering and computer science.

Read more about University Of Utah College Of EngineeringHistory, Accreditation, Rankings, Departments, Notable Faculty, College Deans

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University Of Utah College Of Engineering - College Deans
... College of Engineering Deans Tenure Bio Joseph F. 1897–1928 Before becoming dean of the College of Engineering, Merrill was the director of the State School of Mines ... The first modern four-year engineering degree at the school was introduced in 1895 with Joseph F ...

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