University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility

The University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility, better known as the Body Farm and sometimes seen as the Forensic Anthropology Facility, was started in late 1971 by anthropologist William M. Bass as a facility for study of the decomposition of human remains. It is located a few miles from downtown Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, behind the University of Tennessee Medical Center.

It consists of a 2.5-acre (10,000 m2) wooded plot, surrounded by a razor wire fence. Bodies are placed in different settings throughout the facility and left to decompose. The bodies are exposed in a number of ways in order to provide insights into decomposition under varying conditions. The Facility has expanded from just 20 exposed bodies in 2003 to around 150 in 2007.

Read more about University Of Tennessee Anthropological Research FacilityProgram Advocates, Progression and Future

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University Of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility - Progression and Future - Body Donation
... Donating a person's body after death will ensure that research can continue, and thirty to fifty bodies are donated each year ... only be donated if first cremated, which is still considered useful for research ... Pre-donation paperwork must also be completed prior to a body being transported to the facility ...

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