United States Expedition To Korea - Treaty of Amity and Commerce

Treaty of Amity and Commerce

From April to May 1882, the United States and Korea negotiated and approved a 14-article treaty. The treaty established mutual friendship and mutual assistance in case of attack; and also addressed such specific matters as extraterritorial rights for American citizens in Korea and most favored nation trade status.

The treaty remained in effect until the annexation of Korea in 1910.

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Other articles related to "treaty of amity and commerce":

Treaty Of Amity And Commerce

There have been several treaties named the Treaty of Amity and Commerce:

  • 1778 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce (United States–France)
  • 1782 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce (United States–Dutch Republic)
  • 1783 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce (United States–Sweden)
  • 1784 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce (United States-Venetian Republic)
  • 1785 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce (Prussia–United States)
  • 1794 – Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation, better known as the Jay Treaty (between the United States and Britain)
  • 1826 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce (Siam–UK), also known as Burney Treaty
  • 1833 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce (Siam–United States)
  • 1858 – Anglo-Japanese Treaty of Amity and Commerce
  • 1858 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce between France and Japan
  • 1858 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce (United States – Japan), also known as the Harris Treaty
  • 1887 – Sino-Portuguese Treaty of Amity and Commerce ceding Macau
  • 1897 – Korean-American Treaty of Amity and Commerce
  • 1960 – Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation between Japan and the Republic of the Philippines
  • 1966 – Treaty of Amity and Economic Relations (Thailand–United States)

Famous quotes containing the words commerce, treaty and/or amity:

    Indeed, I believe that in the future, when we shall have seized again, as we will seize if we are true to ourselves, our own fair part of commerce upon the sea, and when we shall have again our appropriate share of South American trade, that these railroads from St. Louis, touching deep harbors on the gulf, and communicating there with lines of steamships, shall touch the ports of South America and bring their tribute to you.
    Benjamin Harrison (1833–1901)

    No treaty is ever an impediment to a cheat.
    Sophocles (497–406/5 B.C.)

    The amity that wisdom knits not, folly may easily untie.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)