United Nations General Assembly Resolution 3379

United Nations General Assembly Resolution 3379, adopted on November 10, 1975 by a vote of 72 to 35 (with 32 abstentions), "determine that Zionism is a form of racism and racial discrimination"; resolution 3379 was revoked in 1991 by UN General Assembly Resolution 4686.

Read more about United Nations General Assembly Resolution 3379:  Background, The Resolution of 1975, The Israeli Response, The United States Response, Aftermath, Voting Record

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United Nations General Assembly Resolution 3379 - Voting Record
... Arabia, Somalia, South Yemen, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and United Arab Emirates ... Voted yes (72) The 25 sponsoring nations above, and additionally 47 nations Albania, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Byelorussian SSR, Democratic Kampuchea, Cameroon ... Malawi, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Swaziland, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay ...

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