Typhoid Mary - Death

Death

Mallon spent the rest of her life in quarantine. Six years before her death, she was paralyzed by a stroke. On November 11, 1938, aged 69, she died of pneumonia. An autopsy found evidence of live typhoid bacteria in her gallbladder. Her body was cremated, and the ashes were buried at Saint Raymond's Cemetery in the Bronx.

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Famous quotes containing the word death:

    The death clock is ticking slowly in our breast, and each drop of blood measures its time, and our life is a lingering fever.
    Georg Büchner (1813–1837)