Two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - Heteronuclear Through-bond Correlation Methods

Heteronuclear Through-bond Correlation Methods

Heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy gives signals based upon coupling between nuclei between two different types. Often the two nuclei are protons and another nucleus (called a "heteronucleus"). For historical reasons, experiments which record the proton rather than the heteronucleus spectrum during the detection period are called "inverse" experiments. This is because the low natural abundance of most heteronuclei would result in the proton spectrum being overwhelmed with signals from molecules with no active heteronuclei, making it useless for observing the desired, coupled signals. With the advent of techniques for suppressing these undesired signals, inverse correlation experiments such as HSQC, HMQC, and HMBC are actually much more common today. "Normal" heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy, in which the hetronucleus spectrum is recorded, is known as HETCOR.

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Other articles related to "heteronuclear, correlations, methods":

Two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - Heteronuclear Through-bond Correlation Methods - Heteronuclear Multiple-bond Correlation Spectroscopy (HMBC)
... HMBC detects heteronuclear correlations over longer ranges of about 2–4 bonds ... The difficulty of detecting multiple-bond correlations is that the HSQC and HMQC sequences contain a specific delay time between pulses which allows detection only of a ... This is not a problem for the single-bond methods since the coupling constants tend to lie in a narrow range, but multiple-bond coupling constants cover a much wider range and cannot all be captured in a ...

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