Twelve-tone Technique

Twelve-tone technique (also dodecaphony, twelve-tone serialism, and, in British usage, twelve-note composition) is a method of musical composition devised by Arnold Schoenberg. The technique is a means of ensuring that all 12 notes of the chromatic scale are sounded as often as one another in a piece of music while preventing the emphasis of any one note through the use of tone rows, an ordering of the 12 pitches. All 12 notes are thus given more or less equal importance, and the music avoids being in a key. The technique was influential on composers in the mid-twentieth century.

Schoenberg himself described the system as a "Method of Composing with Twelve Tones Which are Related Only with One Another". However, the common English usage is to describe the method as a form of serialism.

Josef Matthias Hauer also developed a similar system using unordered hexachords, or tropes, at the same time and in the same country as Schoenberg but with no connection to Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique. Other composers have created systematic use of the chromatic scale, but Schoenberg's method is considered to be historically and aesthetically most significant.

Read more about Twelve-tone Technique:  History of Use, Tone Row, Schoenberg's Mature Practice

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Twelve-tone Technique - Schoenberg's Mature Practice
... Ten features of Schoenberg's mature twelve-tone practice are characteristic, interdependent, and interactive Hexachordal inversional combinatoriality ...

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