Tube (structure)

Tube (structure)

In structural engineering, the tube is the system where in order to resist lateral loads (wind, seismic, etc.) a building is designed to act like a hollow cylinder, cantilevered perpendicular to the ground. This system was introduced by Fazlur Rahman Khan while at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill's (SOM) Chicago office. The first example of the tube’s use is the 43-story Khan-designed DeWitt-Chestnut Apartment Building in Chicago, Illinois, completed in 1963.

The system can be constructed using steel, concrete, or composite construction (the discrete use of both steel and concrete). It can be used for office, apartment and mixed-use buildings. Most buildings in excess of 40 stories constructed since the 1960s are of this structural type.

Read more about Tube (structure):  Concept, History

Other articles related to "tube, tubes":

Tube (structure) - Variations - Bundled Tube
... Instead of one tube a building consists of several tubestied together to resist the lateral forces ... Such buildings have interior columns along the perimeters of the tubeswhen they fall within the building envelope ... The bundle tubedesign was not only highly efficient in economic terms, but it was also "innovative in its potential for versatile formulation of architectural space ...

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    Gore Vidal (b. 1925)