Truth

Truth is most often used to mean in accord with fact or reality or fidelity to an original or to a standard or ideal.

The opposite of truth is falsehood, which, correspondingly, can also take on a logical, factual, or ethical meaning. The concept of truth is discussed and debated in several contexts, including philosophy and religion. Many human activities depend upon the concept, which is assumed rather than a subject of discussion, including science, law, and everyday life.

Various theories and views of truth continue to be debated among scholars and philosophers. Language and words are a means by which humans convey information to one another and the method used to recognize a "truth" is termed a criterion of truth. There are differing claims on such questions as what constitutes truth: what things are truthbearers capable of being true or false; how to define and identify truth; the roles that revealed and acquired knowledge play; and whether truth is subjective or objective, relative or absolute.

Many religions consider perfect knowledge of all truth about all things (omniscience) to be an attribute of a divine or supernatural being.

Read more about Truth:  Nomenclature, Orthography, and Etymology, Major Theories of Truth, In Medicine and Psychiatry, In Religion: Omniscience

Other articles related to "truth":

Verifiability, Not Truth
... to define the threshold for inclusion in Wikipedia as "verifiability, not truth" ... the threshold for inclusion is verifiability, not truth" meant that verifiability is a necessary condition (a minimum requirement) for the inclusion of material, though it is not a sufficient condition (it may ... rules for the inclusion of material does not mean Wikipedians have no respect for truth and accuracy, just as a court's reliance on rules of evidence does not mean the court does not ...
Pragmatic Theory Of Truth
... Pragmatic theory of truth refers to those accounts, definitions, and theories of the concept truth that distinguish the philosophies of pragmatism and pragmaticism ... The conception of truth in question varies along lines that reflect the influence of several thinkers, initially and notably, Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, and John ... on the pragmatic maxim as a means of clarifying the meanings of difficult concepts, truth in particular, and (2) an emphasis on the fact that the product variously branded as belief, certainty ...
Truth-conditional Semantics - History
... The first truth-conditional semantics was developed by Donald Davidson in Truth and Meaning (1967) ... It applied Tarski's semantic theory of truth to a problem it was not intended to solve, that of giving the meaning of a sentence ...
Truth - In Religion: Omniscience
... In a religious context, perfect knowledge of all truth about all things (omniscience) is regarded by some religions, particularly Buddhism and the Abrahamic ...
Verifiability, Not Truth - Editors Are Not Truth Finders
... This process involves editors who are not making claims that they have found truth, but that they have found someone else who is making claims that they have found truth ... guideline for that where multiple points of view (the Wikipedia's term for versions of truth) are included ... Wikipedia editors are not indifferent to truth, but as a collaborative project, its editors are not making judgments as to what is true and what is false, but what can be verified in a ...

Famous quotes containing the word truth:

    Who says that fictions only and false hair
    Become a verse? Is there in truth no beauty?
    George Herbert (1593–1633)

    Others have been made fools of by the girls; but, this can never be with truth said of me. I most emphatically, in this instance, made a fool of myself.
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

    The lesson which these observations convey is, be, and not seem. Let us acquiesce. Let us take our bloated nothingness out of the path of the divine circuits. Let us unlearn our wisdom of the world. Let us lie low in the lord’s power, and learn that truth alone makes rich and great.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)