Trousers

Trousers are an item of clothing worn from the waist to the ankles, covering both legs separately (rather than with cloth stretching across both as in skirts and dresses). The word trousers is used in the UK and Ireland, but some other English-speaking countries such as Canada, South Africa, and the United States often refer to such items of clothing as pants, a shortening of the historic term pantaloons. Australia is known to differentiate between pants and trousers. Shorts are similar to trousers, but with legs that come down only to around the area of the knee, higher or lower than the knee depending on the style of the garment.

In most of the Western world, trousers have been worn since ancient times and throughout the Medieval period, becoming the most common form of lower body clothing for males in the modern period, although shorts are also widely worn, and kilts and other garments may be worn in various regions and cultures. Since the 20th century, trousers have become prevalent for females as well. Shorts are often preferred in hot weather or for some sports, and also often by children. Trousers are worn at the hips or waist, and may be held up by their own fastenings, a belt, or suspenders (braces). Leggings are form-fitting trousers of a clingy material, often knitted cotton and spandex.

Read more about Trousers:  Terminology, Society, Law

Other articles related to "trousers":

St Albans Girls' School - Uniform
... The uniform consists of a navy blue blazer with badge, a navy, knee-length skirt or navy trousers, a navy jumper with school trim and blue badge with embroidered STAGs ... clothes, which include a smart skirt of reasonable length or smart full-length trousers and a blouse or top with sleeves ... Boys should wear a formal shirt and trousers ...
Christleton High School - School Uniform
... a white shirt (or polo shirt during the summer term with the school crest), grey or black trousers or skirt, a tie (optional during the summer term) and a navy blue ... uniform, consisting of - for males - a top with collar (shirt or t-shirt) and any trousers excluding tracksuit bottoms, and for females - a sleeved top (that covers ...
Centre For Higher Secondary Education - History - Change of School Uniform
... was established both male and female students were allowed to come to school in shirts and trousers of any colour ... their uniforms to scarf, long sleeved shirts, trousers and skirts ... In 1998, the uniform was changed from skirts/trousers of different colours to skirts and trousers of dark blue only and white shirt or blouse ...
Trousers - Law
... it a crime to appear in public wearing trousers below the waist and thereby exposing one's skin or "intimate clothing" ... It is not clear whether, with the same coverage by the trousers, exposing underwear was considered worse than exposing bare skin, or whether the latter was already covered by ...
Trouser
... Trousers are an item of clothing worn from the waist to the ankles, covering both legs separately (rather than with cloth extending across both legs as in skirts and dresses) ... Britain, the word "pants" generally means underpants and not trousers.) Shorts are similar to trousers, but with legs that come down only to around the area of the knee, higher or ... To distinguish them from shorts, trousers may be called "long trousers" in certain contexts such as school uniform, where tailored shorts may be called "short ...

Famous quotes containing the word trousers:

    You should never have your best trousers on when you turn out to fight for freedom and truth.
    Henrik Ibsen (1828–1906)

    I grow old . . . I grow old . . .
    I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled.

    Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach?
    I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach.
    I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each.

    I do not think that they will sing to me.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    Think of the many different relations of form and content. E.g., the many pairs of trousers and what’s in them.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)