Trigger Lock - Rules and Mindset

Rules and Mindset

Gun safety training seeks to instill a certain mindset and appropriate habits by following specific rules. The mindset is that firearms are inherently dangerous and must always be stored carefully and handled with care. Handlers are taught to treat firearms with respect for their destructive capabilities, and strongly discouraged from playing or toying with firearms, a common cause of accidents.

The rules of gun safety follow from this mindset. There are many variations, and one of them is the Four Rules introduced by Colonel Jeff Cooper, which are:

  1. All guns are always loaded.
  2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
  3. Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on the target.
  4. Be sure of your target and what is beyond it.
—Jeff Cooper

The NRA provides a similar set of rules:

  1. ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction.
  2. ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.
  3. ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use.
—The National Rifle Association, The fundamental NRA rules for safe gun handling

The Canadian Firearms Program uses the concept of The Four Firearm ACTS:

  1. Assume every firearm is loaded.
  2. Control the muzzle direction at all times.
  3. Trigger finger off trigger and out of trigger guard.
  4. See that the firearm is unloaded. PROVE it safe.
—Canadian Firearms Centre, The Four ACTS of Firearm Safety

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Other articles related to "rules and mindset, rule, rules":

Gun Safety Classes - Rules and Mindset - Be Sure of Your Target and Of What Is Beyond It
... This rule is intended to eliminate or minimize damage to non-targets when a firearm is intentionally discharged ... Therefore, this rule requires a handler to "always be sure of your target not just the target itself, but above, below, to the left, to the right, in front of, and behind the target" ... as injury to the handler due to hesitation, or the handler violating rules of engagement and causing unintended damage ...

Famous quotes containing the words rules and and/or rules:

    Rules and particular inferences alike are justified by being brought into agreement with each other. A rule is amended if it yields an inference we are unwilling to accept; an inference is rejected if it violates a rule we are unwilling to amend. The process of justification is the delicate one of making mutual adjustments between rules and accepted inferences; and in the agreement achieved lies the only justification needed for either.
    Nelson Goodman (b. 1906)

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    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)