Train Robbery

Train robbery is a type of robbery, in which the goal is to steal money or other valuables being carried aboard trains. A person engaged in robbing trains is known as a train robber.

Read more about Train Robbery:  History, List of Train Robbers, Famous Train Robberies, In Fiction

Other articles related to "train robbery, train":

Train Robberies - In Fiction
... The Great Train Robbery, film (1903) The Great Train Robbery, novel (1975) The First Great Train Robbery, film, (1979) The Train Job, an episode of the TV series Firefly that involved a ... Breaking Bad in which methylamine is stolen from a train ...
The Great K & A Train Robbery
... The Great K A Train Robbery is a 1926 American Western silent film directed by Lewis Seiler and starring Tom Mix and Dorothy Dwan ... The film is based on the actual foiling of a train robbery by Dick Gordon as related by Paul Leicester Ford in his book The Great K A Train Robbery originally published as a serial in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in ...
Laura Bullion - Outlaw Life - Aliases and Disguises
... Ben Kilpatrick fled east to evade the law after a train robbery in 1901, the couple travelled under the names "Mr ... In an arrest report following the train robbery, dated November 6, 1901, Bullion's name is filed as "Della Rose" and her aliases are stated to be "Clara ... the suspicion that she, "disguised as a boy", might have taken part in a train robbery in Montana ...
Train Robbery - In Fiction
... The Great Train Robbery, film (1903) The Great Train Robbery, novel (1975) The Train Job, an episode of the TV series Firefly that involved a train robbery ... an episode of the TV series Breaking Bad in which methylamine us stolen from a train ...
Drug Of Choice
... Strain (1969) The Terminal Man (1972) The Great Train Robbery (1975) Eaters of the Dead (1976) Congo (1980) Sphere (1987) Jurassic Park (1990) Rising Sun (1992) Disclosure (1994) The Lost World (1995) Airframe (1996 ...

Famous quotes containing the word train:

    The beginning of reform is not so much to equalize property as to train the noble sort of natures not to desire more, and to prevent the lower from getting more.
    Aristotle (384–322 B.C.)