Train - Trains in Popular Culture

Trains in Popular Culture

See:

  • Rail transport in fiction
  • List of train songs
  • Toy train
  • Train game
  • Rail transport modelling
  • Category:Train simulation video games

Read more about this topic:  Train

Other articles related to "popular, popular culture":

History Of Belgium - Interwar Period - Art and Culture
... Comic strips became extremely popular in Belgium during the 1930s ... One of the most popular comics of the 20th century, Hergé's The Adventures of Tintin first appeared in 1929 ... The growth of comic strips was also accompanied by a popular art movement, exemplified by Edgar P ...
Wadden Sea - Recreation
... Many of the islands have been popular seaside resorts since the 19th century ... walking on the sandy flats at low tide, has become popular in the Wadden Sea ... It is also a popular region for pleasure boating ...
Julia (given Name)
... It was the 10th most popular name for girls born in the United States in 2007 and the 88th most popular name for females in the 1990 census there ... It was the 89th most popular name for girls born in England and Wales in 2007 the 94th most popular name for girls born in Scotland in 2007 the 13th most popular ...
Forensic Entomology - In Literature
... Early twentieth-century popular scientific literature began to pique a broader interest in entomology ... The very popular ten-volume book series, Alfred Brehem’s Thierleben (Life of Animals, 1876–1879) expounded on many zoological topics, including arthropods ... and entomology became an established part of Western popular culture, which in turn inspired other scientists to continue and expand upon his research ...

Famous quotes containing the words culture, trains and/or popular:

    It is of the essence of imaginative culture that it transcends the limits both of the naturally possible and of the morally acceptable.
    Northrop Frye (b. 1912)

    Every American travelling in England gets his own individual sport out of the toy passenger and freight trains and the tiny locomotives, with their faint, indignant, tiny whistle. Especially in western England one wonders how the business of a nation can possibly be carried on by means so insufficient.
    Willa Cather (1876–1947)

    That popular fable of the sot who was picked up dead-drunk in the street, carried to the duke’s house, washed and dressed and laid in the duke’s bed, and, on his waking, treated with all obsequious ceremony like the duke, and assured that he had been insane, owes its popularity to the fact that it symbolizes so well the state of man, who is in the world a sort of sot, but now and then wakes up, exercises his reason and finds himself a true prince.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)